CALIFORNIA POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION COMMISSION

NOTICE OF IMPENDING CLOSURE

Funding for CPEC has been eliminated from the 2011-12 state budget; as a result, the agency will close in fall 2011. The website will move to the Community College Chancellor's Office on Friday, 9/23/2011. It will be down over the weekend. It is not known what sections of the website will be available in the future.

Glossary

All Categories (352)
This glossary contains terms found in Commission publications, on this website, and in the education community. Several subsets of this glossary are available; click on the description in the menu to view them.
TermDefinition
4 - 1 - 4Academic year consisting of:
  • Four courses taken for four months
  • One course taken for one month
  • Four courses taken for four months
(Data Element Dictionary)
ABD "All But Degree" or "All But Dissertation"Not a formal degree; applies to someone who has completed all the requirements for a Ph.D. except the dissertation.
Academic Library Current Operations & Acquisitions Price Index (LPI)The LPI reports the relative year-to-year price level of goods and services purchased by postsecondary institution libraries for their current operations. The priced components of LPI are organized into three parts -- personnel compensation, acquisitions and contracted services, and supplies and materials.
Academic Performance Index (API)The Academic Performance Index (API) is the cornerstone of California's Public Schools Accountability Act of 1999 (PSAA). The purpose of the API is to measure the academic performance and growth of schools. It is a numeric index (or scale) that ranges from a low of 200 to a high of 1000. A school's score on the API is an indicator of a school's performance level. The statewide API performance target for all schools is 800. A school's growth is measured by how well it is moving toward or past that goal. A school's API Base is subtracted from its API Growth to determine how much the school improved in a year.
Academic YearAn academic year is the period of time K-12, colleges and universities use to measure a quantity of study. Academic years vary from school to school. Typically, the length of an academic year runs August/September through May/June. The academic year usually equates to two semesters, two trimesters, three quarters, or the period covered by a 4-1-4 calendar system. The Commission has standardized its data around an academic year starting with the Summer term or session and ending with the Spring term or session. For example, the 2004-05 academic year consists of the Summer 2004, Fall 2004, Winter 2005, and Spring 2005 terms.
Academic YearAn academic year is the period of time K-12, colleges and universities use to measure a quantity of study. Academic years vary from school to school. Typically, the length of an academic year runs August/September through May/June. The academic year usually equates to two semesters, two trimesters, three quarters, or the period covered by a 4-1-4 calendar system. The Commission has standardized its data around an academic year starting with the Summer term or session and ending with the Spring term or session. For example, the 2004-05 academic year consists of the Summer 2004, Fall 2004, Winter 2005, and Spring 2005 terms.
ACCJCAcronym for the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The ACCJC, one of the Commissions of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), evaluates and accredits public and private postsecondary institutions offering one or more educational programs of two academic years in length that grant the associate degree.
Achievement GapThe U.S. Department of Education describes the achievement gap as the difference in academic performance between different ethnic groups.

In California, the gap is defined as the disparity between white students and other ethnic groups and between English learners and native English speakers, socioeconomically disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged, and students with disabilities as compared to students without disabilities.

Achievement GapThe U.S. Department of Education describes the achievement gap as the difference in academic performance between different ethnic groups.

In California, the gap is defined as the disparity between white students and other ethnic groups and between English learners and native English speakers, socioeconomically disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged, and students with disabilities as compared to students without disabilities.

Achievement GapThe U.S. Department of Education describes the achievement gap as the difference in academic performance between different ethnic groups.

In California, the gap is defined as the disparity between white students and other ethnic groups and between English learners and native English speakers, socioeconomically disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged, and students with disabilities as compared to students without disabilities.

Achievement Tests (ACH)Subject examinations, administered by the College Board, used to measure academic achievement and for student placement.
ACTACT is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides more than a hundred assessment, research, information, and program management services in the broad areas of education and workforce development. ACT administers a standardized external battery of tests administered by the American College Testing Program covering English, mathematics, reading and science reasoning. The tests are designed to assess the student's educational development and readiness for college-level study and may be used by institutions in lieu of SAT.
ACTACT is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides more than a hundred assessment, research, information, and program management services in the broad areas of education and workforce development. ACT administers a standardized external battery of tests administered by the American College Testing Program covering English, mathematics, reading and science reasoning. The tests are designed to assess the student's educational development and readiness for college-level study and may be used by institutions in lieu of SAT.
Admissions OfficeThe office responsible for admitting students to the institution.
Advanced DegreeAn award conferred by a college, university, or other postsecondary education as official recognition for the successful completion of a program of studies past the baccalaureate level. These degrees include:
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
  • Post-Masters Certificate
  • Further Professional Certificate
  • Master's Degree
  • Doctoral Degree
  • Middle/Intermediate Degree
  • First-Professional Degree
Advanced Placement CoursesCourses in high school that prepare students to take examinations that allow them to earn college credits while in high school.
Advanced StandingThe practice of placing a student in a course based on previous achievement levels, e.g., study at another institution, by challenge examination, AP or CLEP examination results.
Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)Advancement Via Individual Determination is a fourth- through twelfth-grade system to prepare students in the academic middle for four-year college eligibility. The program places academically average students in advanced classes and provides them with additional support and mentoring designed to prepare motivated but under performing students for four-year college eligibility. AVID students enroll in rigorous curriculum, including Advanced Placement courses and the AVID elective class. The program is open to all students and targets minority, rural, low-income and other students without a college-going tradition in their families.
A-G CoursesRefers to the University of California's Subject Requirement for admission, prospective freshmen must complete a series of high school courses known as the "a-g" requirements. The "a-g" requirements include 16 units of high school courses, seven units of which must be taken in the last two years of high school. A unit is equal to one academic year, or two semesters, of study. In the Commission databases, the "a-g" Completions indicate the number of high school graduates that completed all "a-g" courses with a grade of “C” or higher.

The Requirements are in the following subjects:

  • (a) History/Social Science
  • (b) English
  • (c) Mathematics
  • (d) Lab Science
  • (e) Lang Other Than English
  • (f) Visual & Performing Arts
  • (g) College Prep Elective
A-G CoursesRefers to the University of California's Subject Requirement for admission, prospective freshmen must complete a series of high school courses known as the "a-g" requirements. The "a-g" requirements include 16 units of high school courses, seven units of which must be taken in the last two years of high school. A unit is equal to one academic year, or two semesters, of study. In the Commission databases, the "a-g" Completions indicate the number of high school graduates that completed all "a-g" courses with a grade of “C” or higher.

The Requirements are in the following subjects:

  • (a) History/Social Science
  • (b) English
  • (c) Mathematics
  • (d) Lab Science
  • (e) Lang Other Than English
  • (f) Visual & Performing Arts
  • (g) College Prep Elective
A-G CoursesRefers to the University of California's Subject Requirement for admission, prospective freshmen must complete a series of high school courses known as the "a-g" requirements. The "a-g" requirements include 16 units of high school courses, seven units of which must be taken in the last two years of high school. A unit is equal to one academic year, or two semesters, of study. In the Commission databases, the "a-g" Completions indicate the number of high school graduates that completed all "a-g" courses with a grade of “C” or higher.

The Requirements are in the following subjects:

  • (a) History/Social Science
  • (b) English
  • (c) Mathematics
  • (d) Lab Science
  • (e) Lang Other Than English
  • (f) Visual & Performing Arts
  • (g) College Prep Elective
AICCUAcronym for the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities. The AICCU represents a group of 76 California independent colleges and universities. These seventy-six institutions work together to maintain the high standards of a private college education in the association and report information about member schools to State, federal, and private agencies. AICCU members account for an estimated 98 percent of the independent sector’s total enrollment in California postsecondary education. Student’s attending AICCU institutions also receive 93 percent of the State financial assistance received by students attending an independent college or university in the state. The AICCU nonprofit independent colleges and universities should not be confused with "proprietary" schools or "for-profit" and degree-granting institutions that are not regionally accredited. Examples include Stanford University, Santa Clara University, Pepperdine University, National University, the University of Pacific, and University of Southern California.
AICCUAcronym for the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities. The AICCU represents a group of 76 California independent colleges and universities. These seventy-six institutions work together to maintain the high standards of a private college education in the association and report information about member schools to State, federal, and private agencies. AICCU members account for an estimated 98 percent of the independent sector’s total enrollment in California postsecondary education. Student’s attending AICCU institutions also receive 93 percent of the State financial assistance received by students attending an independent college or university in the state. The AICCU nonprofit independent colleges and universities should not be confused with "proprietary" schools or "for-profit" and degree-granting institutions that are not regionally accredited. Examples include Stanford University, Santa Clara University, Pepperdine University, National University, the University of Pacific, and University of Southern California.
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)The ADA (1990) prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, state and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation.
APAcronym for Advanced Placement Program, referring to high school courses that prepare students to take examinations which allow them to earn college credits while in high school and, therefore, lessen the time it takes to earn a baccalaureate degree.
APAcronym for Advanced Placement Program, referring to high school courses that prepare students to take examinations which allow them to earn college credits while in high school and, therefore, lessen the time it takes to earn a baccalaureate degree.
APAcronym for Advanced Placement Program, referring to high school courses that prepare students to take examinations which allow them to earn college credits while in high school and, therefore, lessen the time it takes to earn a baccalaureate degree.
ArticulationArticulation is the process by which coursework completed in one education system is given credit in another. In California, this process generally refers to sets of community college courses that CSU and UC faculty agree to accept as having the focus, content and rigor necessary to meet course requirements at the baccalaureate institutions. Formal course articulation agreements generally fall within one of three areas: (1) general education breadth agreements, such as those represented by IGETC, (2) transferable course agreements, such as those approved by the State University in various systemwide decrees, and (3) course-by-course agreements, which are generally used to build articulation of lower-division coursework required for a particular major.
Articulation AgreementAn official agreement in which one collegiate institution agrees to accept specific courses or groups of courses from another collegiate institution in place of its own courses. In California, this process generally refers to agreements involving sets of community college courses that CSU and UC faculty agree to accept as having the focus, content and rigor necessary to meet course requirements at the baccalaureate institutions.
ArtsBridgeUC ArtsBridge is the arts education outreach program of the University of California. The mission of UC ArtsBridge is to work in partnership with California public schools to provide high quality arts education to California's K-12 school children. UC ArtsBridge provides scholarships to qualified students, graduate and undergraduate, to teach the arts and conduct arts-related workshops in art, dance, drama, music, and digital arts to surrounding communities
ASSIST (Articulation System Stimulating Interinstitutional Student Transfer)ASSIST is a computerized student-transfer information system that can be accessed over the World Wide Web. It displays reports of how course credits earned at one California college or university can be applied when transferred to another. ASSIST is the official repository of articulation for California’s colleges and universities and therefore provides the most accurate and up-to-date information available about student transfer in California. ASSIST is a student-centered, electronic information system for students planning to transfer. It serves as a key component of a comprehensive statewide information and advising system to enhance student transfer, and provides universal online access to articulation. ASSIST's mission is to facilitate the transfer of California Community College students to California's public four-year universities by providing an electronic system for academic planning which delivers accurate, timely, and complete information and operates as the official repository of articulation information for the state of California.
ASSIST (Articulation System Stimulating Interinstitutional Student Transfer)ASSIST is a computerized student-transfer information system that can be accessed over the World Wide Web. It displays reports of how course credits earned at one California college or university can be applied when transferred to another. ASSIST is the official repository of articulation for California’s colleges and universities and therefore provides the most accurate and up-to-date information available about student transfer in California. ASSIST is a student-centered, electronic information system for students planning to transfer. It serves as a key component of a comprehensive statewide information and advising system to enhance student transfer, and provides universal online access to articulation. ASSIST's mission is to facilitate the transfer of California Community College students to California's public four-year universities by providing an electronic system for academic planning which delivers accurate, timely, and complete information and operates as the official repository of articulation information for the state of California.
Associate DegreeAn award that normally requires at least 2 but less than 4 years of full-time equivalent college work.
Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU)The Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities. The AICCU represents a group of 76 California independent colleges and universities. These seventy-six institutions work together to maintain the high standards of a private college education in the association and report information about member schools to State, federal, and private agencies.

AICCU members account for an estimated 98 percent of the independent sector’s total enrollment in California postsecondary education. Student’s attending AICCU institutions also receive 93 percent of the State financial assistance received by students attending an independent college or university in the state. The AICCU nonprofit independent colleges and universities should not be confused with "proprietary" schools or "for-profit" and degree-granting institutions that are not regionally accredited.

Examples include Stanford University, Santa Clara University, Pepperdine University, National University, the University of Pacific, and University of Southern California.

ATP CodeThe American Testing Program (ATP) Code or College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Code is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The ATP Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
ATP CodeThe American Testing Program (ATP) Code or College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Code is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The ATP Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
ATP CodeThe American Testing Program (ATP) Code or College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Code is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The ATP Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
AttritionStudents that leave or dropout prior to completion of their education program.
AttritionStudents that leave or dropout prior to completion of their education program.
AttritionStudents that leave or dropout prior to completion of their education program.
AYP (Adequate Yearly Progress)Under the No Child Left Behind Act, each State must establish a definition of "adequate yearly progress" (AYP) to use each year to determine the achievement of each school district and school. For California, there are four components.
  1. A minimum percentage of students at each school, each district, and each student subgroup perform at or above the proficiency level in English-language arts and mathematics each year on state assessments.
  2. All schools, districts, and student subgroups must have at least 95 percent of their students take the designated state tests.
  3. The school and district must show growth in their Academic Performance Index (API) score.
  4. The school and district must show growth in the high school graduation rate (high schools, high school districts, or unified school districts only).
BaccalaureateBachelor's degree.
Bachelor's DegreeAn award that normally requires at least 4 but not more than 5 years of full-time equivalent college-level work. This includes all bachelor's degrees conferred in a 5-year cooperative (work-study plan) program. A cooperative plan provides for alternate class attendance and employment in business, industry, or government; thus, it allows students to combine actual work experience with their college studies. Also includes bachelor's degrees in which the normal 4 years of work are completed in 3 years.
Boeckh Construction Index (Boeckh)The Boeckh Division of the American Appraisal Company computes the Boeckh index. It is a measurement of inflation on building apartments, hotels and office buildings -- a mix of facilities relatively applicable to structures built on college campuses. The Boeckh index is a "fixed input" type of index of wage rates and building material prices weighted together. It covers the structural portion of building and all the integral plumbing, heating, lighting and elevators.
Bond FundsThe capital outlay displays identify two types of bonds "General Obligation Bonds" and "Other State Bonds." "General Obligation Bonds" are general issue bonds that are approved by the Legislature and State voters with repayment guaranteed from the State's general revenue source (i.e., taxes). "Other State Bonds" are revenue bonds that are sold to fund specific projects whose repayment is guaranteed by revenues that the funded project is expected to generate. Examples of the types of projects funded by revenue bonds are parking structures and dormitories. These operations charge fees to their users, and those fees are used, in part, to retire the accumulated debt of the bonds.
BPPEAcronym for the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education. The BPPE is a branch of the California Department of Consumer Affairs. The BPPE serves as the state's oversight and regulatory agency for private proprietary institutions.
BPPEAcronym for the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education. The BPPE is a branch of the California Department of Consumer Affairs. The BPPE serves as the state's oversight and regulatory agency for private proprietary institutions.
Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE)The Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE) is a unit in the California Department of Consumer Affairs. The BPPE serves as the state's oversight and regulatory agency for private proprietary postsecondary institutions.
Cal Grant Financial Aid ProgramsThrough the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC), the State operates the Cal Grants A and B Entitlement Program, the Cal Grant A and B Competitive Program, and the Cal Grant C Program. The Cal Grant Program is the single largest state-funded program of postsecondary financial aid in the United States. Initiated in 1955, it now encompasses three major grant award types.

Senate Bill 1644 (Ortiz, Chapter 403, Statutes of 2000) changed the scope of the Cal Grant A and B Programs in 2000 creating two distinct programs, Entitlement and Competitive. The Cal Grant A Entitlement Program provides tuition and fee assistance to low- and middle-income students, and the Cal Grant B Entitlement Program provides access allowance and tuition & fee assistance to disadvantaged and low-income students.

Cal Grant A Competitive Awards are for students with a minimum 3.0 GPA who are from low-and middle-income families. These awards help pay tuition and fees at qualifying schools with academic programs that are at least two years in length. Cal Grant B Competitive Awards are for students with a minimum 2.0 GPA who are from disadvantaged and low-income families.

Cal Grant A and B Competitive Awards are for students who either aren't eligible for the Entitlement awards or who missed the application deadlines for the Entitlement award program. The main difference is that the Competitive awards are not guaranteed. For both Cal Grant A and B Competitive Programs, eligibility is based on financial need and academic qualification. The Competitive program is limited to 22,500 awards.

CSAC also operates the Cal Grant C Program, which helps vocational education students with tuition and training costs. This program provides assistance with tuition & fee and books & supplies to vocationally oriented low- and middle-income students. Eligibility for the "C" program is based on financial need. Cal Grant C awards help pay for tuition and training costs at occupational or career colleges. This $576 award is for books, tools and equipment. You may also receive up to an additional $2,592 for tuition at a school other than a California Community College. To qualify, you must enroll in a vocational program that is at least four months long at a California Community College, private college, or a vocational school. Funding is available for up to two years, depending on the length of your program.

Cal Grants A and B Entitlement Program, and Cal Grant A and B Competitive ProgramThe Entitlement program is not limited to the number of annual awards. The Cal Grant A Entitlement Program helps needy students with the tuition and fees portion of the costs involved in attending college. The Cal Grant B Entitlement Program provides a living allowance and sometimes tuition and fee aid for low-income students. Grant winners are selected on the basis of both financial need and grade point average. The Competitive program is limited to 22,500 awards. For both Cal Grant A and B Competitive Programs, eligibility is based on financial need and academic qualification.

Cal Grant C Program helps vocational education students with tuition and training costs.

California Academic Partnership Program (CAPP)The California Academic Partnership Program (CAPP) is a partnership between California higher education institutions and public schools. CAPP awards grants to partnerships between schools, higher education institutions and business entities to improve academic programs so that more students are prepared for college. CAPP was established by the California State Legislature in 1984 for the purpose of developing cooperative efforts to improve the academic quality of public secondary schools with the objective of improving the preparation of all students for college. CAPP supports the establishment of academic partnerships between secondary schools and community colleges, public or private baccalaureate degree-granting institutions, and business enterprises aimed at: Transforming the relationships between educational institutions in ways that directly benefit students; Improving curriculum in subject areas required for admission to college; Strengthening teachers' capacities to enable all students to learn the curriculum; Enhancing the ability of students to benefit from these changes; and Improving postsecondary and business partners' understanding of these students' unique needs.
California Community CollegesOne of the three public segments of higher education in California, the community colleges is the State's system of two-year public institutions. It is composed of 109 colleges statewide organized into 71 districts, serves about 2 million students and represents the largest system of higher education in the world. Primary missions of the community colleges are to offer academic and vocational education at the lower division level for both recent high school graduates and those returning to school. Another primary mission is to advance California's economic growth and global competitiveness through education, training, and services that contribute to continuous workforce improvement. Essential and important functions of the colleges include: basic skills instruction, providing English as a second language, adult noncredit instruction, and providing support services that help students to succeed. Fee-based Community Service education is designated as an authorized function. To the extent funding is provided the Colleges may conduct institutional research concerning student learning and retention as is needed to facilitate their educational missions.
California Consumer Price Index ( CPI )The California Consumer Price Index is calculated by the State's Department of Finance, in consultation with the California Department of Industrial Relations, and is conceptually based upon the U.S. CPI. It was initially established as a population-weighted average of the five-county Los Angeles area and the 10-county San Francisco all-items survey in the late 1940s.
California Personal IncomeCalifornia Per-capita personal income is derived by dividing the State’s total personal income (TPI) by its population. TPI is the sum of all of the money earned by all of the residents of the State in a given year.
California State UniversityOne of the three public segments of higher education. The California State University (CSU)system includes 23 campuses across the state and serves more than 368,000 students annually. The CSU is the largest, the most diverse, and one of the most affordable university systems in the country. It is the gateway institution for the great majority of students seeking a baccalaureate education in California, and for those who seek professional training as teachers, nurses, social workers, and engineers. The individual California State Colleges were brought together as a system by the Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960. In 1972 the system became The California State University and Colleges and in 1982 the system became The California State University. The oldest campus--San Jose State University--was founded in 1857 and became the first institution of public higher education in California. The newest campus-- California State University, Channel Islands accepted its first freshmen class in 2003. Today the campuses of the CSU include comprehensive and polytechnic universities and, since July 1995, the California Maritime Academy, a specialized campus.
California State UniversityOne of the three public segments of higher education. The California State University (CSU)system includes 23 campuses across the state and serves more than 368,000 students annually. The CSU is the largest, the most diverse, and one of the most affordable university systems in the country. It is the gateway institution for the great majority of students seeking a baccalaureate education in California, and for those who seek professional training as teachers, nurses, social workers, and engineers. The individual California State Colleges were brought together as a system by the Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960. In 1972 the system became The California State University and Colleges and in 1982 the system became The California State University. The oldest campus--San Jose State University--was founded in 1857 and became the first institution of public higher education in California. The newest campus-- California State University, Channel Islands accepted its first freshmen class in 2003. Today the campuses of the CSU include comprehensive and polytechnic universities and, since July 1995, the California Maritime Academy, a specialized campus.
California Student Opportunity and Access Program (Cal-SOAP)The California Student Opportunity and Access Program (Cal-SOAP) was established by the state legislature in 1978. Cal-SOAP works to improve the flow of information about postsecondary education and financial aid while raising the achievement levels of low-income, elementary and secondary school students or geographic regions with documented low-eligibility or college participation rates, and who are first in their families to attend college.

Cal-SOAP operates projects in sixteen locations throughout the state by consortia made up of secondary and postsecondary schools and community agencies. Cal-SOAP works in cooperation with other intersegmental outreach programs to avoid service duplication.

Current Cal-SOAP projects include: Central Coast (Santa Maria), Central Valley (San Joaquin), East Bay (Oakland and Richmond), Greater Long Beach Region, Los Angeles, Merced, North Coast (Eureka), North Valley (Yuba), Sacramento College Horizons, San Diego/Imperial, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Barbara, South County Gilroy, South San Joaquin, and Solano.

Because each project specializes in serving students within its community, the types of programs and services may differ. However, the projects share the common goal of improving the flow of information about postsecondary education and financial aid while raising achievement levels of targeted students. Some common services provided by the consortia includes advising, tutoring, parent outreach, and college awareness workshops.

The Cal-SOAP program is administered by the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC), with individual projects applying each year for continued state funding. By law, each state allocation must be matched by an equal or higher level of local resources. A 12-member, legislatively mandated advisory committee works with CSAC in administering the program.

California Subject Matter Projects (CSMP)The California Subject Matter Project (CSMP) is a professional development organization for educators comprised of a network of nine discipline-based statewide projects. CSMP works to improve student achievement and learning through comprehensive, discipline-based professional development of teachers, especially those who teach in the state's high priority schools.

CSMP sites are organized into 15 regional councils consisting of site leadership that includes university faculty, school and district personnel, county office coordinators and teacher leaders who work together to respond to the needs of teachers and students across the state. Sites are hosted by regional campuses of the University of California, California State University, and independent colleges and universities.

The CSMP network includes the subject matter content represented in the California K-12 standards and frameworks and all of the academic disciplines to support college entrance requirements. The CSMP provides classroom teachers with a variety of professional learning opportunities such as workshops, leadership institutes and in-service designed by teacher leaders and faculty content specialists to improve instruction for all learners. Participants engage in research and use research-based strategies to improve their practice in the teaching of reading, writing, literature, foreign language, mathematics, science, history, international studies, physical and health education, and the arts.

The nine CSMP professional development discipline-specific projects are:
  • The California Arts Project
  • California Foreign Language Project
  • California History-Social Science Project
  • California International Studies Project
  • California Mathematics Project
  • California Physical Education and Health Project
  • California Reading and Literature Project
  • California Science Project
  • California Writing Project
CAN (California Articulation Number System) – no longer operationalThe California Articulation Number System (CAN) was a course identification system for common core lower-division transferable, major preparation courses commonly taught at community college and CSU campuses. Colleges and universities that demonstrated common acceptance of courses through traditional articulation agreements were able to qualify courses for CAN designations. Courses with CAN designators were accepted by any participating institution as being comparable to courses with the same CAN designators to meet local requirements, even if the receiving university had not established an explicit traditional articulation agreement with a particular community college. CAN was designed as a cross-reference course identification system for a common core of lower-division, transferable, major preparation courses commonly taught on community college, CSU, and UC campuses. CAN was created to promote the transfer of community college students to UC and CSU by simplifying the identification of transferable courses and indicating the disciplines and programs at institutions to which those courses are transferable. CAN was funded by the state through the CSU and community colleges and was discontinued in 2006.
CAN (California Articulation Number System) – no longer operationalThe California Articulation Number System (CAN) was a course identification system for common core lower-division transferable, major preparation courses commonly taught at community college and CSU campuses. Colleges and universities that demonstrated common acceptance of courses through traditional articulation agreements were able to qualify courses for CAN designations. Courses with CAN designators were accepted by any participating institution as being comparable to courses with the same CAN designators to meet local requirements, even if the receiving university had not established an explicit traditional articulation agreement with a particular community college. CAN was designed as a cross-reference course identification system for a common core of lower-division, transferable, major preparation courses commonly taught on community college, CSU, and UC campuses. CAN was created to promote the transfer of community college students to UC and CSU by simplifying the identification of transferable courses and indicating the disciplines and programs at institutions to which those courses are transferable. CAN was funded by the state through the CSU and community colleges and was discontinued in 2006.
CAPI (Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiative)Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiatives (CAPI) is a California State University grant-funded partnership. CAPI is a collaborative effort between university and high school teachers designed to help high school students achieve their academic goals and ultimately become successful college students. Using workshops and on-site collaboration in Math and English, CAPI develops, pilots, and refines teaching strategies and techniques designed to achieve program goals.

The collaborative is made up of CSU faculty, high school faculty, and college and high school students. As of the early 200s, CAPI consisted of around 200 high school partnerships formed with 19 CSU campuses involving 231 CSU faculty members and 1,128 high school teachers

CAPI offers a variety of professional training workshops and activities that help make teaching high school a more enjoyable and successful experience for both teachers and students alike.
CAPI (Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiative)Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiatives (CAPI) is a California State University grant-funded partnership. CAPI is a collaborative effort between university and high school teachers designed to help high school students achieve their academic goals and ultimately become successful college students. Using workshops and on-site collaboration in Math and English, CAPI develops, pilots, and refines teaching strategies and techniques designed to achieve program goals.

The collaborative is made up of CSU faculty, high school faculty, and college and high school students. As of the early 200s, CAPI consisted of around 200 high school partnerships formed with 19 CSU campuses involving 231 CSU faculty members and 1,128 high school teachers

CAPI offers a variety of professional training workshops and activities that help make teaching high school a more enjoyable and successful experience for both teachers and students alike.
Capital Outlay Funds used for Public Higher Education (COFPHE)Capital outlay funds used for public higher education are defined as COFPHE. They are derived from Tidelands oil revenues and collected by the State Lands Commission.
Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education ActKnown as the Perkins Act, this federal program supplements state secondary, postsecondary, and adult vocational education programs, with the goal of improving educational programs leading to academic, occupational, training, upgrading and retraining skill competencies needed to work in a technologically advanced society.
Carnegie Classification CodeA classification system created by the Carnegie Foundation. This classification, which dates back to 1970, currently includes 3,600 colleges and universities in the United States that are degree-granting and accredited by an agency recognized by the Secretary, U.S. Department of Education. According to the 1994 classification, there are 10 categories that are based on the highest level of offering, the number of degrees conferred by discipline, and the amount of federal support for research received by the institution. The new system of classification was created in 2000. (Data Element Dictionary)
Catalog RightsA policy that allows, in certain circumstances, a college student to select the set of requirements, he/she will follow to qualify for university graduation. Course articulation, major-specific – Sets of courses that CSU and UC faculty accept as having the focus, content and rigor necessary to meet course prerequisite requirements for specific majors that have lower division requirements. The term discipline-specific is often used within SB 121, by former Senator Gary Hart (Chapter 1188, Statutes of 1991) to refer to major-specific course articulation agreements. This articulation is also referred to as “Major Prep” articulation and, for prospective transfer students, is generally preferable to course-to-course articulation. Articulation agreements specific to the community college student’s major of choice are more focused and tend to require that the student take fewer courses in general than non major-specific agreements.
CCCAcronym for the California Community Colleges. The CCC system of two-year public institutions is composed of 109 colleges statewide organized into 71 districts. The community colleges serve about 2 million students and represents the largest system of higher education in the world.
CCCAcronym for the California Community Colleges. The CCC system of two-year public institutions is composed of 109 colleges statewide organized into 71 districts. The community colleges serve about 2 million students and represents the largest system of higher education in the world.
CCC College IDThe 3-digit code used by the California Community College Chancellor's Office to identify the reporting college in data submitted to the Chancellor's Office.
CCCCOAcronym for the California Community College’s Chancellor’s Office. The Chancellor’s Office is the administrative branch of the California Community College system. Located in Sacramento, this state agency provides leadership and technical assistance to the 109 community colleges and 71 community college districts in California. It is also responsible for allocating state funding to the colleges and districts. The Chancellor's Office operates under the guidance of the Board of Governors, which sets policy and provides long-range planning and guidance to the Chancellor and his staff. The Chancellor’s Office includes seven major divisions conducting the business of the system: College Finance and Fiscal Policy Planning; Legal Affairs and Contracts; Educational Services and Economic Development; Policy, Planning and External Affairs; Student Services; Human Resources; and Internal Affairs.
CDEAcronym for the California Department of Education.
CDEAcronym for the California Department of Education.
CDS CodeThe CDS (County-District-School) code system is an administrative convenience designed to provide the California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Finance (DOF), and postsecondary institutions with a basis for tracking schools. The CDS code is a unique identifier that allows schools to be easily sorted and tracked in databases. This 14-digit code is the official, unique identification of a school within California. The first two digits identify the county, the next five digits identify the school district, and the last seven digits identify the school. A CDS code is a number assigned to a school. CDS codes are not assigned to programs. Evidence that the entity is a school rather than a program is provided by the governing board action approving formation of the school and board action establishing the school. Governing boards can act only by a majority vote at a public meeting (Education Code §§ 1011, 1013, 1040, 35163, 35164; Government Code § 54950 and following (the Brown Act)).
CDS CodeThe CDS (County-District-School) code system is an administrative convenience designed to provide the California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Finance (DOF), and postsecondary institutions with a basis for tracking schools. The CDS code is a unique identifier that allows schools to be easily sorted and tracked in databases. This 14-digit code is the official, unique identification of a school within California. The first two digits identify the county, the next five digits identify the school district, and the last seven digits identify the school. A CDS code is a number assigned to a school. CDS codes are not assigned to programs. Evidence that the entity is a school rather than a program is provided by the governing board action approving formation of the school and board action establishing the school. Governing boards can act only by a majority vote at a public meeting (Education Code §§ 1011, 1013, 1040, 35163, 35164; Government Code § 54950 and following (the Brown Act)).
CDS CodeThe CDS (County-District-School) code system is an administrative convenience designed to provide the California Department of Education (CDE), the Department of Finance (DOF), and postsecondary institutions with a basis for tracking schools. The CDS code is a unique identifier that allows schools to be easily sorted and tracked in databases. This 14-digit code is the official, unique identification of a school within California. The first two digits identify the county, the next five digits identify the school district, and the last seven digits identify the school. A CDS code is a number assigned to a school. CDS codes are not assigned to programs. Evidence that the entity is a school rather than a program is provided by the governing board action approving formation of the school and board action establishing the school. Governing boards can act only by a majority vote at a public meeting (Education Code §§ 1011, 1013, 1040, 35163, 35164; Government Code § 54950 and following (the Brown Act)).
CEEB CodeCollege Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Code (aka ATP Code) is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The CEEB Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
CEEB CodeCollege Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Code (aka ATP Code) is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The CEEB Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
CEEB CodeCollege Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Code (aka ATP Code) is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The CEEB Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
Central Coast Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region consists of three counties just south of the San Francisco Bay Area (View a map):
  • Monterey
  • San Benito
  • Santa Cruz
Central Coast RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
Central Valley ProgramsLinks and coordinates various academic preparation programs for high school students in California's Central Valley. These programs help prepare students for college and seek to improve college eligibility for high school students from the area are prepared to be attend college. These programs seek to provide a pipeline of local students for the University of California Merced campus, which opened in 2005.
CertificateA formal award certifying the satisfactory completion of a postsecondary education program which usually require two or less years of undergraduate course work and are vocationally/occupationally oriented.
Charter SchoolSchools run independently of the traditional public school system but receiving public funding, run by groups such as teachers, parents, or foundations. Charter schools are free of many district regulations and are often tailored to community needs.
CIPAcronym for the Classification of Instructional Programs. This is a National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) publication that provides a numerical classification and standard terminology for secondary and postsecondary instructional programs.
Class RankThe relative position of a student in his or her graduating class, determined by grade average.
CLEP (College Level Examination Program)A program offered by the College Board designed to offer students the opportunity to earn college credit by examination.
CLEP (College Level Examination Program)A program offered by the College Board designed to offer students the opportunity to earn college credit by examination.
Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiatives (CAPI)Collaborative Academic Preparation Initiatives (CAPI) is a California State University grant-funded partnership. CAPI is a collaborative effort between university and high school teachers designed to help high school students achieve their academic goals and ultimately become successful college students. Using workshops and on-site collaboration in Math and English, CAPI develops, pilots, and refines teaching strategies and techniques designed to achieve program goals.

The collaborative is made up of CSU faculty, high school faculty, and college and high school students. As of the early 200s, CAPI consisted of around 200 high school partnerships formed with 19 CSU campuses involving 231 CSU faculty members and 1,128 high school teachers

CAPI offers a variety of professional training workshops and activities that help make teaching high school a more enjoyable and successful experience for both teachers and students alike.
College BoardThe College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,500 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. The Board contracts with the Educational Testing Service to create and administer its Admissions Testing Program (SAT I, SAT II - Subject Matter, and Advanced Placement tests), as well as reports to students indicating their performance on the tests.
College Board CodeCollege Board Code (aka ATP Code or CEEB Code) is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The College Board Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
College Board CodeCollege Board Code (aka ATP Code or CEEB Code) is a 6-digit number that is used by standardized tests such as SAT and ACT. The first 2 digits indicate the state; all California schools start with "05". The College Board Code is a 4-digit number for higher education institutions.
College Prep Initiative (UCCP)The UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) is a University of California program offering Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, tutoring, and AP exam preparation to high school students over the Internet. UCCP provides these services at no cost to students from eligible schools.

UCCP instructors are qualified and experienced subject area experts, often high school AP teachers or college professors. These online instructors are available to grade assignments, confer with students via email, and communicate in real-time during online office hours. UCCP requires that high schools designate a mentor to supervise students and facilitate course delivery. The mentor monitors student daily attendance, provides encouragement, and helps troubleshoot any technical problems that might occur.

UCCP offers a combination of courses purchased from commercial vendors and courses developed by UCCP. In partnership with UC faculty, UCCP is actively engaged in developing new courses and services. All courses meet California curriculum standards and are fully articulated with University of California admission requirements.
College Prep Initiative (UCCP)The UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) is a University of California program offering Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, tutoring, and AP exam preparation to high school students over the Internet. UCCP provides these services at no cost to students from eligible schools.

UCCP instructors are qualified and experienced subject area experts, often high school AP teachers or college professors. These online instructors are available to grade assignments, confer with students via email, and communicate in real-time during online office hours. UCCP requires that high schools designate a mentor to supervise students and facilitate course delivery. The mentor monitors student daily attendance, provides encouragement, and helps troubleshoot any technical problems that might occur.

UCCP offers a combination of courses purchased from commercial vendors and courses developed by UCCP. In partnership with UC faculty, UCCP is actively engaged in developing new courses and services. All courses meet California curriculum standards and are fully articulated with University of California admission requirements.
Concurrent High SchoolIncludes students who are taking college classes while still enrolled in their K-12 school.
Continuing Education Revenue FundRevenue generated by fees from the following nontraditional programs: concurrent enrollment, extension, and external degree.
COSAR CodeRefers to California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office Systemwide Administrative Reporting Code. This is the 6-digit school code portion of the 14-digit County-District-School (CDS) Code.
COSAR CodeRefers to California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office Systemwide Administrative Reporting Code. This is the 6-digit school code portion of the 14-digit County-District-School (CDS) Code.
Cost of AttendanceThe cost of attendance for a college student is generally defined as including: tuition and fees, books, supplies and related educational materials, housing, transportation, miscellaneous personal expenses, and dependent care, if applicable. Each institution determines its own student cost. Some of these expenses are not included in the cost of attendance for students attending on less than ahalf-time basis or those who are telecommuting or using other remot-access technology. In some cases, the cost of attendance may include additional costs: if the student is disabled, the cost of attendance includes an allowance for extra costs related to the disability. If the student is enrolled in a formal course of study outside the United States, the cost of attendance may include the cost of travel to and from the foreign place of study.
Course Articulation, System WideAgreements by faculty that a set of courses offered by community colleges are equivalent to similar courses offered at CSU and UC. Credits earned by students in these courses are accepted by every campus within CSU or UC and are applied toward degree requirements. Generally, these courses are lower-division, general education courses.
CPEC CodeEach higher education institution in California is assigned a 6-digit code by the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC). The first digit, which is a letter code, refers to the Segment; the other 5 digits refer to a specific institution.
CSMP (California Subject Matter Projects)The California Subject Matter Project (CSMP) is a professional development organization for educators comprised of a network of nine discipline-based statewide projects. CSMP works to improve student achievement and learning through comprehensive, discipline-based professional development of teachers, especially those who teach in the state's high priority schools.

CSMP sites are organized into 15 regional councils consisting of site leadership that includes university faculty, school and district personnel, county office coordinators and teacher leaders who work together to respond to the needs of teachers and students across the state. Sites are hosted by regional campuses of the University of California, California State University, and independent colleges and universities.

The CSMP network includes the subject matter content represented in the California K-12 standards and frameworks and all of the academic disciplines to support college entrance requirements. The CSMP provides classroom teachers with a variety of professional learning opportunities such as workshops, leadership institutes and in-service designed by teacher leaders and faculty content specialists to improve instruction for all learners. Participants engage in research and use research-based strategies to improve their practice in the teaching of reading, writing, literature, foreign language, mathematics, science, history, international studies, physical and health education, and the arts.

The nine CSMP professional development discipline-specific projects are:
  • The California Arts Project
  • California Foreign Language Project
  • California History-Social Science Project
  • California International Studies Project
  • California Mathematics Project
  • California Physical Education and Health Project
  • California Reading and Literature Project
  • California Science Project
  • California Writing Project
CSMP (California Subject Matter Projects)The California Subject Matter Project (CSMP) is a professional development organization for educators comprised of a network of nine discipline-based statewide projects. CSMP works to improve student achievement and learning through comprehensive, discipline-based professional development of teachers, especially those who teach in the state's high priority schools.

CSMP sites are organized into 15 regional councils consisting of site leadership that includes university faculty, school and district personnel, county office coordinators and teacher leaders who work together to respond to the needs of teachers and students across the state. Sites are hosted by regional campuses of the University of California, California State University, and independent colleges and universities.

The CSMP network includes the subject matter content represented in the California K-12 standards and frameworks and all of the academic disciplines to support college entrance requirements. The CSMP provides classroom teachers with a variety of professional learning opportunities such as workshops, leadership institutes and in-service designed by teacher leaders and faculty content specialists to improve instruction for all learners. Participants engage in research and use research-based strategies to improve their practice in the teaching of reading, writing, literature, foreign language, mathematics, science, history, international studies, physical and health education, and the arts.

The nine CSMP professional development discipline-specific projects are:
  • The California Arts Project
  • California Foreign Language Project
  • California History-Social Science Project
  • California International Studies Project
  • California Mathematics Project
  • California Physical Education and Health Project
  • California Reading and Literature Project
  • California Science Project
  • California Writing Project
CSUAcronym for the California State University, which is administered by the Office of the Chancellor of the California State University. The California State University is the largest, the most diverse, and one of the most affordable university systems in the country. It is the gateway institution for the great majority of students seeking a baccalaureate education in California, and for those who seek professional training as teachers, nurses, social workers, and engineers. The CSU offers more than 1,800 bachelor's and master's degree programs in some 240 subject areas. Many of these programs are offered so that students can complete all upper-division and graduate requirements by part-time late afternoon and evening study. In addition, a variety of teaching and school service credential programs are available. A limited number of doctoral degrees are offered jointly with the University of California and with private institutions in California.
CSUAcronym for the California State University, which is administered by the Office of the Chancellor of the California State University. The California State University is the largest, the most diverse, and one of the most affordable university systems in the country. It is the gateway institution for the great majority of students seeking a baccalaureate education in California, and for those who seek professional training as teachers, nurses, social workers, and engineers. The CSU offers more than 1,800 bachelor's and master's degree programs in some 240 subject areas. Many of these programs are offered so that students can complete all upper-division and graduate requirements by part-time late afternoon and evening study. In addition, a variety of teaching and school service credential programs are available. A limited number of doctoral degrees are offered jointly with the University of California and with private institutions in California.
CSUAcronym for the California State University, which is administered by the Office of the Chancellor of the California State University. The California State University is the largest, the most diverse, and one of the most affordable university systems in the country. It is the gateway institution for the great majority of students seeking a baccalaureate education in California, and for those who seek professional training as teachers, nurses, social workers, and engineers. The CSU offers more than 1,800 bachelor's and master's degree programs in some 240 subject areas. Many of these programs are offered so that students can complete all upper-division and graduate requirements by part-time late afternoon and evening study. In addition, a variety of teaching and school service credential programs are available. A limited number of doctoral degrees are offered jointly with the University of California and with private institutions in California.
CTE (Career Technical Education) ProgramsPrograms (disciplines) that prepare students for entry into a wide variety of employment opportunities in 15 industry sectors.
CTE (Career Technical Education) ProgramsPrograms (disciplines) that prepare students for entry into a wide variety of employment opportunities in 15 industry sectors.
Cumulative Grade Point AverageThe numerical average of all the student's grades achieved during the period of study at an institution.
DefermentA deferment is a period of time that a borrower can postpone making scheduled loan repayments to the lender. For some loans, interest does not accrue during a deferment period. Even though loan payments are postponed, repayments are not cancelled – the repayment period is simply extended by the period of deferment. A deferment for full-time or part-time study at an eligible college or university is referred to as an “in-school deferment.”
DegreeAn award conferred by a college, university, or other postsecondary education as official recognition for the successful completion of a program of studies. Types of degrees include:
  • Certificate
  • Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - Less than 1 Year
  • Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - At least 1 but less than 2 Years
  • Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - At least 2 but less than 4 Years
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
  • Post-Masters Certificate
  • Further Professional Certificate
  • Associate Degree
  • Bachelor's Degree
  • Master's Degree
  • Doctoral Degree
  • Middle/Intermediate Degree
  • First-Professional Degree
DelinquentA loan is considered to be delinquent when a borrower doesn’t make a payment or file for a deferment to delay payment on a loan on the schedule set forth in the loan agreement. A borrower can be charged late fees for being late or delinquent in making loan payments. If a borrower misses a number of payments in a row, the loan can be considered in default.
Dependency StatusFor federal student finanical aid purposes, a student’s dependency status determines whether or not the student is financially able to pay college costs or is dependent upon his/her parents to meet these costs. All students are considered dependents of their parents unless of of the following conditions apply: the student is at least 24 years of age as of January 1 of the year of attendance, is married, is a graduate or professional student, has a legal dependent other than a spouse, is a Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces, is/was an orphan or ward of the court, or was a ward of the court until 18 years of age.
Doctoral DegreeThe doctoral degree classification includes such degrees as Doctor of Education, Doctor of Juridical Science, Doctor of Public Health, and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in any field such as agronomy, food technology, education, engineering, public administration, ophthalmology, or radiology. For the Doctor of Public Health degree, the prior degree is generally earned in a closely related professional field of medicine or in sanitary engineering.
Dual DegreeProgram of study in which a student receives two degrees from the same institution.
Dunn & Bradstreet NumberRefers to Data Universal Numbering System. This 9-digit number is assigned by the Dunn & Bradstreet Information Corporation to any entity providing products, goods, or services.
EAOP (Early Academic Outreach Program)Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP) is a program works directly with students at underserved schools to increase the number of students who have the opportunity to achieve a college education. The purpose of EAOP is to increase the number of students who have the opportunity to achieve a postsecondary education. EAOP employs four key program services-academic enrichment, entrance exams, academic advising, and college knowledge- to successfully help students attain college eligibility and attend college.

EAOP is the largest UC academic preparation program, serving over 39,000 students at 43 middle schools and 266 high schools. In 2007, EAOP provided 27,000 students with academic planning, 12,000 seniors with financial aid and college application assistance, 9,000 students with college visits, and 8,500 students with educational field trips. EAOP reports its outcomes to the legislature annually as part of the SAPEP accountability report.
EAOP (Early Academic Outreach Program)Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP) is a program works directly with students at underserved schools to increase the number of students who have the opportunity to achieve a college education. The purpose of EAOP is to increase the number of students who have the opportunity to achieve a postsecondary education. EAOP employs four key program services-academic enrichment, entrance exams, academic advising, and college knowledge- to successfully help students attain college eligibility and attend college.

EAOP is the largest UC academic preparation program, serving over 39,000 students at 43 middle schools and 266 high schools. In 2007, EAOP provided 27,000 students with academic planning, 12,000 seniors with financial aid and college application assistance, 9,000 students with college visits, and 8,500 students with educational field trips. EAOP reports its outcomes to the legislature annually as part of the SAPEP accountability report.
Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP)Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP) is an academic college-preparatory program designed for students who have the potential for college, but who need early encouragement. From elementary through high school, students work with EAOP counselors and participate in challenging, academic programs that will prepare them for university work.
Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)The EOP (Educational Opportunity Program) is designed to improve access and retention of low-income and educationally disadvantaged students. EOP students have the potential to perform satisfactorily in CSU but have not been able to realize their potential because of their economic or educational background. The program provides admission, academic, and financial assistance to EOP-eligible undergraduate students.
Elementary-Secondary School Price Index (SPI)The SPI measures the effects of inflation on the current operations of elementary and secondary schools. It reports relative price levels that schools pay for a fixed group of goods and services for their daily operation. These expenses include administration, instruction (mostly teacher salaries), plant operation and maintenance, and other costs. Costs excluded are capital outlay and debt service.
EOP (Educational Opportunity Program)The EOP (Educational Opportunity Program) is designed to improve access and retention of low-income and educationally disadvantaged students. EOP students have the potential to perform satisfactorily in CSU but have not been able to realize their potential because of their economic or educational background. The program provides admission, academic, and financial assistance to EOP-eligible undergraduate students.
EOP (Educational Opportunity Program)The EOP (Educational Opportunity Program) is designed to improve access and retention of low-income and educationally disadvantaged students. EOP students have the potential to perform satisfactorily in CSU but have not been able to realize their potential because of their economic or educational background. The program provides admission, academic, and financial assistance to EOP-eligible undergraduate students.
EthnicityRacial/ethnic designations reported in the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Systems (IPEDS) do not denote scientific definitions of anthropological origins. The categories are:
Black, non-hispanic - a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa (except those of Hispanic origin).
American Indian or Alaska Native - a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and who maintains cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.
Asian or Pacific Islander - a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or Pacific Islands. This includes people from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, American Samoa, India, and Vietnam.
Hispanic - a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central, or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.
White, non-Hispanic - a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East (except those of Hispanic origin).
(Data Element Dictionary)
Expected Family ContributionExpected Family Contribution (or EFC) is a term used in the college financial aid process. It is the estimate of the parents' and/or student's ability to contribute to paying the costs of the students's postsecondary education. The lower the EFC, the less money a family has to contribute to a child's education and the more financial aid the student is likely to receive.

EFC is usually calculated based on a student's FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Some colleges and universities use the their own forms to help determine the EFC.

The EFC is usually subtracted from the total cost of attendance to determine a student's financial need. If a student's EFC exceeds the projected cost of attendance, the student has financial need. Eligibility for a number of federal, state, local, and institutional aid programs is based on a student's EFC.

Expected Family ContributionExpected Family Contribution (or EFC) is a term used in the college financial aid process. It is the estimate of the parents' and/or student's ability to contribute to paying the costs of the students's postsecondary education. The lower the EFC, the less money a family has to contribute to a child's education and the more financial aid the student is likely to receive.

EFC is usually calculated based on a student's FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Some colleges and universities use the their own forms to help determine the EFC.

The EFC is usually subtracted from the total cost of attendance to determine a student's financial need. If a student's EFC exceeds the projected cost of attendance, the student has financial need. Eligibility for a number of federal, state, local, and institutional aid programs is based on a student's EFC.

Extramural Funds (University of California)All funds not included in the University of California's budget; hence, the terms extramural and non-budgeted are used interchangeably. These funds include sponsored research financed by federal contracts and grants, federal appropriations for the Department of Energy Laboratories, funds related to State agency agreements, and funds from private gifts and grants. These resources are designated as extramural because, with the exception of the laboratories, they are negotiated from year to year (or are negotiated after the end of the contract or grant period) and have no permanence attached to them. They are, therefore, appropriated outside of the budget.
FAFSA – Free Application for Federal Student AidThe Free Application for Federal Student Aid (known as the FAFSA), is a form that can be filled out annually by current and anticipating university students (both undergraduate and graduate) and sometimes their parents in the United States to determine their eligibility for federal student financial aid (including Pell grants, Stafford loans, PLUS loans, and work-study programs). In addition, most states and schools use information from the FAFSA to award non-federal aid.

The FAFSA consists of numerous questions regarding the student's finances, as well as those of his or her family; these are entered into a formula that determines the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). A number of factors are used in determining the EFC including the family size, income, number in college, and assets (not including retirement and 401K). This information is required because of the expectation that parents will contribute to their child's education.

FAFSA – Free Application for Federal Student AidThe Free Application for Federal Student Aid (known as the FAFSA), is a form that can be filled out annually by current and anticipating university students (both undergraduate and graduate) and sometimes their parents in the United States to determine their eligibility for federal student financial aid (including Pell grants, Stafford loans, PLUS loans, and work-study programs). In addition, most states and schools use information from the FAFSA to award non-federal aid.

The FAFSA consists of numerous questions regarding the student's finances, as well as those of his or her family; these are entered into a formula that determines the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). A number of factors are used in determining the EFC including the family size, income, number in college, and assets (not including retirement and 401K). This information is required because of the expectation that parents will contribute to their child's education.

Federal Mineral TaxFunds generated from federally leased lands used for the production of geothermal energy, oil, gas, and minerals. The federal government collects all lease revenue and turns over half to the State.
Federal Unit IDA Federal Unit ID number is a 6-digit identification number assigned to institutions that are in the Postsecondary Education Participants System (PEPS). This system is maintained by the Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) which tracks the eligibility status of postsecondary institutions. This number is an unique identification assigned to postsecondary institutions surveyed through the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Systems (IPEDS).
FICE CodeFICE code is a 6-digit code maintained for historical purposes. This identifier was originally created by the Federal Interagency Committee on Education (FICE) to distinguish postsecondary schools that qualified as institutions of higher education from other postsecondary institutions. As of 1997, this code is no longer maintained.
Financial Aid "Package"A financial aid package is a combination of scholarships, grants, loans, and work study funds provided to students. A postsecondary institution puts together these financial aid resources based upon the student's need and particular circumstances. These aid packages are a means of helping students pay the costs of a college education in the most effective way possible.
First ProfessionalRefers to students who are enrolled in programs leading toward a first-professional degree in the fields of chiropractic, dentistry, law, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, theology, and veterinary medicine.
First-Professional DegreeAn award that requires completion of a program that meets all of the following criteria: 1) completion of the academic requirements to begin practice in the profession; 2) at least 2 years of college work prior to entering the program; and 3) a total of at least 6 academic years of college work to complete the degree program, including prior required college work plus the length of the professional program itself. First-Professional degrees are discipline-specific and may be awarded as follows:
  • Dentistry (D.D.S. or D.M.D.)
  • Medicine (M.D.)
  • Optometry (O.D.)
  • Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.)
  • Podiatric Medicine (D.P.M., D.P., or Pod.D.)
  • Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.)
  • Law (L.L.B, J.D.)
  • Theology (M.Div, M.H.L., B.D., or Ordination)
  • Chiropractic Medicine (D.C. or D.C.M.)
  • Pharmacy (D. Phar.)
ForbearanceForbearance is an arrangement between a lender and the borrower to alter loan payment agreements. These delays can allow a borrower to make smaller payments on the loan, make no payments at all for a short period of time, or provide additional time for a student to make a payment on a loan.

Forbearance assists the borrower by having the lender agree to delays its right to foreclose (cancel) the loan and demand immediate repayment if the borrower can make the overdue loan payments during a set period of time.

FreshmanRefers to a first-year undergraduate student. At the California State University, freshman refer to students who have completed fewer than 30 semester or 45 quarter hours. At the University of California, freshmen refer to students who have completed between 0 and 44.9 quarter units (0 to 29.9 semester units).
FTEThe acronym FTE refers to the term "full-time-equivalent" enrollment, a calculation used by the state to determine funding levels per student. The California State University and the University of California use FTE, to describe units of student workload measure for funding purposes for the systems. For the California State University, the term FTE enrollment is defined to be 15 semester or quarter units. Variations in the academic calendars of the campuses of the CSU are taken into consideration in the definition of the annual FTES, which is equivalent to 30 semester or 45 quarter units. With these definitions, the number of individual students on campus is difficult to determine, but the total volume of instructional activity is more accurately reflected. For the University of California, one undergraduate FTE in the semester system is student enrollment in 15 semester units for two semesters. One graduate FTE in the semester system is student enrollment in 12 semester units for two semesters. In the quarter system, the totals are 45 undergraduate credit units and 36 graduate credit units per academic year, respectively. Though the terms FTE and FTES are often used interchangeably, it is important to note that FTE enrollment and FTES are determined through entirely different methodologies.
FTEThe acronym FTE refers to the term "full-time-equivalent" enrollment, a calculation used by the state to determine funding levels per student. The California State University and the University of California use FTE, to describe units of student workload measure for funding purposes for the systems. For the California State University, the term FTE enrollment is defined to be 15 semester or quarter units. Variations in the academic calendars of the campuses of the CSU are taken into consideration in the definition of the annual FTES, which is equivalent to 30 semester or 45 quarter units. With these definitions, the number of individual students on campus is difficult to determine, but the total volume of instructional activity is more accurately reflected. For the University of California, one undergraduate FTE in the semester system is student enrollment in 15 semester units for two semesters. One graduate FTE in the semester system is student enrollment in 12 semester units for two semesters. In the quarter system, the totals are 45 undergraduate credit units and 36 graduate credit units per academic year, respectively. Though the terms FTE and FTES are often used interchangeably, it is important to note that FTE enrollment and FTES are determined through entirely different methodologies.
Full Time Equivalent Student (FTES)The accronym FTES refers to the term "full-time-equivalent student" enrollment, a calculation used by the state to determine funding levels per student. For the California Community College, one FTES represents 525 class (contact) hours of student instruction/activity in credit and noncredit courses. The number, 525, is derived from the fact that 175 days of instruction are required each year and a student attending three hours per day for 175 days will be in attendance for 525 hours. That is, three times 175 equals 525. The California State University and the University of California use "full-time-equivalent," or FTE, to describe units of student workload measure for funding purposes for the systems. Though the terms FTES and FTE are often used interchangeably, it is important to note that FTE enrollment and FTES are determined through entirely different methodologies.
Full-Time StudentA student who is taking a full load each term. At the University of California (UC), California State University (CSU) and Community Colleges, 12 or more semester units is considered Full-time for undergraduates. At UC and CSU, 12 or more units is considered full-time for graduate students. Full-time for students is 12 or more units.(Data Element Dictionary)
Funded Units of EnrollmentGovernment services are usually funded based on workload measures that typically are a statistical calculation of the number of clients to be served. For California public K-12 education, the unit of workload measure is "Average Daily Attendance," or ADA. One ADA in public K-12 education equals the number of days a student attended school during an academic year (generally 182 days) divided by the number of days school was in attendance that year. A student is assumed as being in attendance for a school day if she or he is there for one session during the day.

California's two public baccalaureate degree-granting education systems, The California State University and the University of California, use the term "full-time-equivalent" enrollment (or, FTE) to describe units of student workload measure for funding purposes for the systems. The California Community Colleges use the term "full-time-equivalent students" (or, FTES) as its student workload measure for funding purposes. FTE student enrollment is based upon the number of course units a student enrolls in during a semester, while FTES are determined by student contact hours of classroom instruction. Though the two terms are used interchangeably here and in other most publications, it is important to note that FTE enrollment and FTES are determined through entirely different methodologies.

For the California Community College, one FTES represents 525 class (contact) hours of student instruction/activity in credit and noncredit courses. The number, 525, is derived from the fact that 175 days of instruction are required each year and a student attending three hours per day for 175 days will be in attendance for 525 hours. That is, three times 175 equals 525.

For the California State University, the term FTE enrollment is defined to be 15 semester or quarter units. Variations in the academic calendars of the campuses of the CSU are taken into consideration in the definition of the annual FTES, which is equivalent to 30 semester or 45 quarter units. With these definitions, the number of individual students on campus is difficult to determine, but the total volume of instructional activity is more accurately reflected.

For the University of California, one undergraduate FTE in the semester system is student enrollment in 15 semester units for two semesters. One graduate FTE in the semester system is student enrollment in 12 semester units for two semesters. In the quarter system, the totals are 45 under-graduate credit units and 36 graduate credit units per academic year, respectively.

Further ProfessionalIncludes all students who are enrolled in a "professional degree" program, and are not categorized as "first professional".
Further Professional CertificateAn award that requires completion of an organized program of study beyond the doctoral or first-professional degree.
General Education Breadth RequirementsA specific program of courses that a student may use to fulfill CSU general education requirements for the baccalaureate degree prior to transferring to a CSU campus. Some of these courses may be taken at a community college or other accredited college or university prior to transfer to a CSU campus.
General Education RequirementsA program of courses in the arts and sciences that provides students with a broad educational experience. Courses typically are introductory in nature and provide students with fundamental skills and knowledge in mathematics, English, arts, humanities, and physical, biological, and social sciences. Transfer students often take these classes while attending a community college. Completion of a general education program is required for the baccalaureate degree.
General Education RequirementsA program of courses in the arts and sciences that provides students with a broad educational experience. Courses typically are introductory in nature and provide students with fundamental skills and knowledge in mathematics, English, arts, humanities, and physical, biological, and social sciences. Transfer students often take these classes while attending a community college. Completion of a general education program is required for the baccalaureate degree.
GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test)A standardized external examination of verbal and quantitative skills usually required by graduate schools of business and used to assess the qualifications of applicants for MBA programs.
GradeAn evaluation (normally by letter on a scale of A-F) of a student's performance on an examination, a paper or in a course.
Grade Point Average (GPA)A system of scoring student achievement used by many colleges and universities. A student's GPA is computed by multiplying the numerical grade received in each course by the number of credits offered for each course, then dividing by the total number of credit hours studied.
Most institutions use the following grade conversion scale: A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, and F = 0.
High school Advanced Placement (AP) courses and “Honors” courses use a grading system which translates to a 5-point scale.
GraduateA graduate is a student who has completed the requirements for a bachelor’s degree and who is enrolled in a master’s or higher degree program in a postsecondary institution.
GraduateA graduate is a student who has completed the requirements for a bachelor’s degree and who is enrolled in a master’s or higher degree program in a postsecondary institution.
Graduate IIncludes all students who hold a bachelor's degree or the equivalent (or first professional degree) and (a) are enrolled in a doctoral degree program, but have not earned a master's degree and have fewer than the equivalent number of credits normally required for a master's degree, or (b) are enrolled in a special, unclassified, visitor, or non-degree seeking status, or (c) are enrolled in an educational specialist certificate, degree, or coordinate intermediate level degree program, whether or not they possess an earned master's degree.
Graduate IIIncludes all students who are enrolled in a doctoral degree program (except "first professional" and "further professional") except those who are classified as Graduate I.
GrantA grant is gift of financial assistance to students that does not have to be repaid. Through the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC), the State operates the Cal Grants A and B Entitlement Program, the Cal Grant A and B Competitive Program, and the Cal Grant C Program.
GRE (Graduate Record Examination)A two-part standardized external examination designed to measure general verbal, quantitative and analytical skills (General Aptitude Test) and knowledge and understanding of subject matter basic to graduate study in specific fields (Advanced Tests). The GRE is generally required by graduate schools and is used to assess the qualifications of applicants to master's and Ph.D. programs.
Green JobGreen occupations are often defined as any activity or service that performs any of the following: generating and storing renewable energy, recycling existing materials, energy efficient product manufacturing, distributing, installing, maintenance and construction, education, compliance and awareness, and natural and sustainable product manufacturing.
HEGISAcronym for the Higher Education General Information Survey system. HEGIS operated between 1966 and 1985.
High SchoolSecondary school (grades 7-12 or 9-12). In the 6+6 scheme, the first three years (grades 7-9) are known as 'junior high school' and final three years (10-12) as 'senior high school'.
Higher Education Price Index (HEPI)Dr. Kent Halstead of Research Associates of Washington developed The Higher Education Price Index (HEPI). It measures the average relative level of prices for goods and services purchased by postsecondary institutions through current educational and general expenditures (E&GE). In this way, HEPI shows changes in the costs of services unique to colleges and universities (such as, faculty salaries, instructional equipment, etc.) in addition to more traditional expenditure categories, such as plant maintenance and utilities. Sponsored research, sales and services of education departments, and other for profit or auxiliary enterprises are not included in the calculation of HEPI.

Specifically, according to Dr. Halstead, HEPI is based upon the following: (1) salaries of college personnel, from faculty and administrators to clerical and nonprofessional staff; (2) contracted services, such as data processing, communication, transportation materials and supplies, maintenance, and equipment; (3) library acquisitions; and, (4) utilities. Weights are assigned to these items representing the relative importance of each item in the current E&GE budget. These data are collected from a variety of sources, including salary surveys conducted by the American Association of University Professors and the College and University Personnel Association and U.S. CPI information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. Information from other price indices is also in the calculation of the HEPI.

HonorsSpecial recognition of student's outstanding academic achievement.
IMPAC (Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum)The Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum (IMPAC) project is a statewide, intersegmental effort where faculty in selected disciplines discuss prerequisite and lower-division courses students must complete prior to transfer to either CSU or UC. Its goal is improving student transfer through increased awareness and involvement of faculty. One aspect of IMPAC is that each discipline develops a grid of all university campus lower division major requirements. These IMPAC Discipline Grids identify specific university requirements and courses and provide a comparison of requirements across campuses including notations of campus-specific variances. IMPAC is supervised by the Intersegmental Council of Academic Senates (ICAS) to get faculty to work together to develop a common understanding of major preparation requirements around the state. IMPAC is one of many efforts to get CSU and UC faculty, respectively, to agree on these basic premises so that faculty in the system will have consistent standards to use to develop actual articulation agreements with other higher education systems. IMPAC is funded through contract funds allocated through the community colleges. This effort was initially funded in the 1999-2000 budget.
IMPAC (Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum)The Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum (IMPAC) project is a statewide, intersegmental effort where faculty in selected disciplines discuss prerequisite and lower-division courses students must complete prior to transfer to either CSU or UC. Its goal is improving student transfer through increased awareness and involvement of faculty. One aspect of IMPAC is that each discipline develops a grid of all university campus lower division major requirements. These IMPAC Discipline Grids identify specific university requirements and courses and provide a comparison of requirements across campuses including notations of campus-specific variances. IMPAC is supervised by the Intersegmental Council of Academic Senates (ICAS) to get faculty to work together to develop a common understanding of major preparation requirements around the state. IMPAC is one of many efforts to get CSU and UC faculty, respectively, to agree on these basic premises so that faculty in the system will have consistent standards to use to develop actual articulation agreements with other higher education systems. IMPAC is funded through contract funds allocated through the community colleges. This effort was initially funded in the 1999-2000 budget.
Impacted ProgramsRefers to those majors that receive more applications during the initial application filing period than there are spaces available. A major may be impacted on one campus, several campuses, or all campuses where it is offered.
Implicit Price Deflators (IPD)These are derived from the national income and products accounts. They are derived as the ratio of current to constant-dollar Gross Domestic Product (GDP), multiplied by 100. They are also weighted averages of the detailed price indexes used in estimating constant-dollar GDP but the indexes are combined using weights that reflect the composition of GDP in each period. Consequently, changes in IPD reflect not only changes in process but also changes in the composition of GDP. Thus, they are generally not designed to be used as measurements of price changes.

The advantage of IPDs is that since they take changing expenditure patterns into account, they are more representative of the actual, or effective rate of inflation in the nation. These deflators are not available at the State or regional level. This limitation is a drawback for most states, however in a large state with a diversified economy such as California a national deflator is probably as representative as would be any state data-based inflation index.

The two major IPDs presented here are the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) deflator and the State and Local Government (S&LG) deflator.

Independent StudentAn independent student, according to criteria established by the federal government, is a college student who meets one or more of the following conditions:
  • 24 years or older by December 31 of the award year;
  • Orphan or ward of the court;
  • Veteran of the Armed Forces of the U.S.; or
  • Graduate/professional student; or
  • Married; or
  • Has legal dependents other than a spouse; or
  • Unusual circumstances that can be documented by the financial aid administrator.
Inflation MeasuresThe report utilizes various statistical measurements of periodic changes in prices as a yardstick for gauging the effect of increased costs and financial obligations on funding for California's public colleges and universities, on levels of student charges (tuition and fees), and faculty salaries. These price (inflation) indices are explained below, using information and descriptions provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the California Department of Finance, and material in the book Inflation Measures for Schools & Colleges, 2000 Update (Research Associates of Washington, September 2000).
Inland Empire RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
Institution CodeIt also refers to CPEC Code. The institution code is a combination of Segment code, which is a letter code and the institution ID which is a 5-digit number code.
Institutions Exempt from State ApprovalInstitutions that are exempt from the regular state approval process and are also listed in this section. To qualify for an exemption there are requirements that must be met as listed in the California Education Code, Title 3, Division 10, Part 59, Chapter 7, Private Postsecondary and Vocational Institutions. Generally, institutions that are exempt from state approval are exempt for the following reasons:
  • The institution is accredited by a national accrediting agency such as the American Bar Association (ABA).
  • The institution is accredited by a regional accrediting agency such as the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).
  • The institution teaches religion and meets all the requirements for a religious exemption.
Instruction-Related Activities (I-R)This term is used to define the average expenditures for instructional activities in the postsecondary education sectors. The public-sector information on instruction-related expenditures was initially generated for the Commission report, "Expenditures for University Instruction" (Commission Report 93-2) which contains background detail on the numbers shown here. The methodology for determining these instruction-related revenue data was developed by the Commission and the three public higher education systems, in consultation with the Department of Finance, the Office of the Legislative Analyst, and other officials involved with that research project. For the California Community Colleges and the California State University, these expenditures were determined by dividing each system's selected fund sources for a given year by their full-time-equivalent (FTE) enrollment for that year to determine average State support per funded student.
InternA student who is taking supervised professional training designed to allow students to apply previously acquired skills and knowledge to practical situations. Internships can be done as part of a course, during vacation or after graduation.
Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC)Often referred to as the "Common-core transfer curriculum," IGETC is a general education program that community college students may use to fulfill lower-division general education requirements at either the CSU or UC without the need, after transfer, to take additional lower-division general education courses. All California community colleges offer an approved list of courses from which students may select to meet general education curricular requirements at the State University or University campuses of their choice. Developed in response to AB 1725 (Vasconcellos, Chapter 973, Statutes of 1988), the curriculum was adopted in 1990 by the Intersegmental Committee of the Academic Senates and implemented in the 1991-92 academic year.
Inyo-Mono RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
IPEDSAcronym for the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, established as the core postsecondary education data collection program for NCES, is a system of surveys designed to collect data from all primary providers of postsecondary education. IPEDS is a single, comprehensive system designed to encompass all institutions and educational organizations whose primary purpose is to provide postsecondary education. The IPEDS system is built around a series of interrelated surveys to collect institution-level data in such areas as enrollments, program completions, faculty, staff, and finances.
JuniorAt the California State University, student level junior refers to students who have completed 60 to fewer than 90 semester or 90 to fewer than 135 quarter credit hours. At the University of California, junior refers to students who have completed at least 90 but not more than 134.9 quarter units (60-89.9 semester units).
Junior StatusRefers to students who have entered the third year of study for a bachelor’s degree. Students who have completed 60-89 semester units are considered juniors.
K-12 School University PartnershipsPartnerships between UC campuses and K-12 schools designed to bridge the gap between postsecondary education and educationally disadvantaged students.
LABI (Los Angeles Basin Initiative)Funded by the University of California Office of the President, and administered by the UCLA campus, the UC-Los Angeles Basin Initiative (UC-LABI) is a collaborative outreach effort of the eight undergraduate UC campuses. The aim of UC-LABI is to enhance the academic preparation and to expand the pool of educationally-disadvantaged students from Los Angeles who are eligible and competitively eligible for UC admission. UC-LABI provides funding to participating UC campuses to offer summer/intersession enrichment programs for Los Angeles County middle school and high school students, community college students, teachers, counselors and administrators.
LABI (Los Angeles Basin Initiative)Funded by the University of California Office of the President, and administered by the UCLA campus, the UC-Los Angeles Basin Initiative (UC-LABI) is a collaborative outreach effort of the eight undergraduate UC campuses. The aim of UC-LABI is to enhance the academic preparation and to expand the pool of educationally-disadvantaged students from Los Angeles who are eligible and competitively eligible for UC admission. UC-LABI provides funding to participating UC campuses to offer summer/intersession enrichment programs for Los Angeles County middle school and high school students, community college students, teachers, counselors and administrators.
Limited StudentAt the University of California, Limited refers to upper division students with bachelor's degrees who are not candidates for an advanced degree or those without bachelor's degrees who have completed a substantial amount of college work and who, by reason of special attainments, may be prepared to under certain courses in the university toward a definite and limited objective. At the California State University, it refers to a student taking 6.0 or fewer units; a designation established for the purpose of assigning students to a particular fee category.
LoanA loan is grant of money that must be repaid to the lender. Loan programs have varying repayment provisions, some of which are governed by state and federal laws. Most loans include requirements for the repayment of the principle (the orginal loan amount), and interest (additional fund charged by the lender for making the loan).
Loan ConsolidationLoan consolidation is any type of financial program where a borrower refinances two or more existing loans into one loan. This allows the borrower to make one loan payment each month that is smaller than the combined total of several different loans.

This type of payment arrangement can be helpful in dealing with the borrower's monthly cash flow, particulalry for borrowers who have several different types of loans each with different payment terms. However, loan consolidation increases the total cost of borrowing and does not discharge (remove) the loan obligation.

Loan DefaultA loan default occurs when a borrower misses a number of payments or simply stops making payments on a loan that is due. If a student defaults on a student loan, the student’s credit rating will be affected and the IRS could take away any tax refund the student expects to receive. In addition, a lender (or the federal government) could charge the borrower whatever collection fees are necessary to collect on the loan, and possibly refer the matter to a court for handling.

If a borrower allows a loan to go into default, the borrower loses the opportunity for deferment (or postponement of repayment), and the borrower will not be able to receive any federal financial aid until satisfactory arrangements to repay the loan have been made with the lender or guarantor or the loan obligation is discharged (handled).

Local RevenuesThis fund source for public K-12 Education and the California Community Colleges is local property taxes, including local government agencies' debt service, excess property tax payments, and State property tax subventions. For the community colleges, these revenues also include nonresident student tuition paid by persons attending the colleges whose legal residence is in another state or country.
Los Angeles Basin Initiative (LABI)Funded by the University of California Office of the President, and administered by the UCLA campus, the UC-Los Angeles Basin Initiative (UC-LABI) is a collaborative outreach effort of the eight undergraduate UC campuses. The aim of UC-LABI is to enhance the academic preparation and to expand the pool of educationally-disadvantaged students from Los Angeles who are eligible and competitively eligible for UC admission. UC-LABI provides funding to participating UC campuses to offer summer/intersession enrichment programs for Los Angeles County middle school and high school students, community college students, teachers, counselors and administrators.
Los Angeles County Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region is self-encompassing, located east of Ventura county, west of San Bernardino county, and south of Kern county (View a map).
Los Angeles RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning purposes. (View a map)
Lottery-Funded OutreachThe Lottery-Funded Outreach program, supported in part by California State Lottery funds, provides high school students with an introduction to CSU campuses and programs. Services include career fairs, student recruitment, and assistance with the admission and financial aid process.
Lower DivisionCourses designed for the first two years or within the first 59 semester units of study toward a baccalaureate degree, often taken at community college and transferred to a university. Also refers to freshman and sophomore students.
Lower DivisionCourses designed for the first two years or within the first 59 semester units of study toward a baccalaureate degree, often taken at community college and transferred to a university. Also refers to freshman and sophomore students.
LSAT (Law School Admission Test)A standardized external examination used by law schools to assess applicants' verbal, analytical and reasoning skills.
Magnet SchoolA public primary or secondary school that places special emphasis on a particular field such as science or art and is designed to attract students with a specific interest, talent, or background.
Major PreparationThis phrase refers to academic coursework taken by prospective transfer students while they are still enrolled at a community college that satisfies some of the requirements of a specific degree major at a receiving institution. Students who have decided on a receiving institution and specific program of study use “major preparation articulation” agreements, which allow them to take coursework needed for the particular major. Good counseling apprises prospective transfer students of the individual requirements of degree programs at institutions and with this knowledge students may plan a path of study that allows them to take discipline-specific courses while still enrolled in the community college. Major preparation transfer agreements are usually preferable for students rather than transfer paths that focus solely on general education courses that satisfy lower-division requirements. Meeting major preparation transfer requirements while in the community college also gives students more freedom when selecting courses once they enroll in the receiving institution and helps expedite their time-to-degree by putting them further along in their selected major at an earlier point.
MastersIncludes students who are enrolled in a master's degree program.
Master's DegreeAn award that requires the completion of a program of study of at least the full-time equivalent of 1 but not more than 2 academic years of work beyond the bachelor's degree.
Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA)Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) is an academic enrichment program that serves educationally disadvantaged students with an emphasis, to the extent possible by law, on students from groups with low rates of college eligibility so they excel in math and science and attain math-based degrees from four-year institutions.
MBAMaster of Business Administration.
MCAT (Medical College Admission Test)A standardized external examination designed to measure specified science knowledge and its application in solving related problems, and of other learning and reasoning skills considered important for the study of medicine, used by medical schools to assess applicants.
Merit-Based AidMerit-based financial aid is aid provided to students because of special talent or ability the student have have. Merit is usually determined by academic measurements such as grades, test scores, rigorous course taking, or similar competitive conditions. This type of aid differs from "need-based" aid in that it is not dependent upon the recipient's financial situation and need for assistance.

Many merit-based financial aid programs do take into account the financial need of the students. The California Student Aid Commission's Cal Grant Competitive Program uses grade-point average to determine persons eligible for an award but also factors in the financial need of students in making the actual awards.

MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement)MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement) is an academic enrichment program that serves educationally disadvantaged students with an emphasis, to the extent possible by law, on students from groups with low rates of college eligibility so they excel in math and science and attain math-based degrees from four-year institutions.
MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement)MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement) is an academic enrichment program that serves educationally disadvantaged students with an emphasis, to the extent possible by law, on students from groups with low rates of college eligibility so they excel in math and science and attain math-based degrees from four-year institutions.
Middle College High SchoolThe Middle College High School program offers high school students the opportunity to attend college classes on community college campuses and earn credit while fulfilling their high school graduation requirements. The goal is to encourage high school students to complete college coursework and to ease their transition into college. Some campuses provide a high school on-site, while others coordinate enrollment and support services for high school students who enroll in community college classes part-time.
Middle/Intermediate DegreeIncludes Education Specialist, Candidate in Philosophy, Master in Philosophy, etc.
Monterey Bay RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS)A national survey of students from public and private 2-year and 4-year colleges designed to determine how students and families pay for college. The survey includes undergraduate, graduate, and first professional students and is conducted every 3-4 years by the National Center of Education Statistics.
National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS)A national survey of students from public and private 2-year and 4-year colleges designed to determine how students and families pay for college. The survey includes undergraduate, graduate, and first professional students and is conducted every 3-4 years by the National Center of Education Statistics.
NCESAcronym for the National Center for Education Statistics. NCES is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data that are related to education in the United States and other nations.
NeedThe term "need", as used in student financial aid, usually refers to the difference between the resources available to a student and the cost of attending the student’s selected postsecondary institution. A students resources may include funds available from parents, students savings, money from work, and other sources.

Once need is determined for a student, a financial aid package is put together that may include grants, loan, work study, or other means of closing the gap between available resources and actual costs.

Need AnalysisNeed analysis is the process of objectively determining the demonstrated need of an applicant for financial aid. The postsecondary institution's financial aid administrator assesses the student’s financial need in order to determine the student’s eligibility for Federal student aid. If these calculations show that a student’s cost of attendance exceeds his or her expected family contribution, the student is identified as having need.

A student's financial need may be addressed in many ways, including: student and parent loans, grants of money that do not have to be repaid, student work study programs, or estimates of money the student will earn from working while in college.

Need-Based AidNeed-based aid is awarded on the basis of the financial needs of the student to attend college. Postsecondary institutions generally use the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to help determine federal, state, and institutional need-based aid eligibility. At private institutions, a supplemental application may be necessary for institutional need-based aid.
Non-Portable FundingThis term refers to college funding that cannot be transferred to another college or university. Many colleges use scholarship funds that are specific to that particular college or university. If a student receiving non-portable funding transfers to another college or university, the scholarship monies remain at that school. Some institutions may even require a repayment of certain scholarship funds if a student leaves the institution in a way that violates the terms of the scholarship award.
North Coast RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
North San Joaquin Valley RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
Northern California Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region is the northern-most portion of the state consisting of 18 counties (View a map):
  • Butte
  • Colusa
  • Del Norte
  • Glenn
  • Humboldt
  • Lake
  • Lassen
  • Mendocino
  • Modoc
  • Nevada
  • Plumas
  • Shasta
  • Sierra
  • Siskiyou
  • Sutter
  • Tehama
  • Trinity
  • Yuba
Northern Central Valley Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region consists of ten counties just south of the Sacramento Area (View a map):
  • Alpine
  • Amador
  • Calaveras
  • Madera
  • Mariposa
  • Merced
  • Mono
  • San Joaquin
  • Stanislaus
  • Tuolumne
O*NETOccupational Information Network (O*NET or ONET) - The nation's primary source of occupational information. The O*NET database has information about hundreds of occupations.
O*NETOccupational Information Network (O*NET or ONET) - The nation's primary source of occupational information. The O*NET database has information about hundreds of occupations.
OPEAcronym for the Office of Postsecondary Education. OPE is a division of U.S. Department of Education.
OPE IDThe OPE (Office of Postsecondary Education) ID is used by the Department of Education for federal student financial aid eligibility purposes. It is an 8-digit number. The first 6 digits of the OPE ID identify the main campus. The last 2 digits represent branch campuses or additional locations. For the main campus the last 2-digits will always be "00".
OPE IDThe OPE (Office of Postsecondary Education) ID is used by the Department of Education for federal student financial aid eligibility purposes. It is an 8-digit number. The first 6 digits of the OPE ID identify the main campus. The last 2 digits represent branch campuses or additional locations. For the main campus the last 2-digits will always be "00".
Orange County Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region is self-encompassing, located just south of Los Angeles county and west of Riverside county (View a map).
Orange County RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. (View a map)
Other Public Colleges and UniversitiesTwo additional public institutions operate in California, Hastings College of the Law and Naval Postgraduate School. Both are supported with monies appropriated by either the State or Federal governments and each has its own governing body.
PAD (Precollegiate Academic Development) ProgramPrecollegiate Academic Development (PAD) Program is a unique program created by the California State University system to help middle and high school students prepare for college level courses as well as provide information and skills to enhance students' access to a higher education. Trained PAD tutors provide personalized academic enrichment in math, reading, and writing for students in selected middle and high schools to assure their success in college level courses.
PAD (Precollegiate Academic Development) ProgramPrecollegiate Academic Development (PAD) Program is a unique program created by the California State University system to help middle and high school students prepare for college level courses as well as provide information and skills to enhance students' access to a higher education. Trained PAD tutors provide personalized academic enrichment in math, reading, and writing for students in selected middle and high schools to assure their success in college level courses.
Part-Time StudentRefers to a student who is taking fewer units than the full load. At the California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC), fewer than 15 semester credit units is considered Part-time for undergraduate students. At CSU and UC, fewer than 12 credit units is considered Part-time for graduate students. At Community College, less than 12 credit units is considered Part-time. (Data Element Dictionary)
Per-CapitaPer-capita calculations divide a given data series by a defined population grouping. For Example, California Per-capita personal income is derived by dividing the State's total personal income (TPI) by its population. TPI is the sum of all of the money earned by all of the residents of the State in a given year. To calculate per-capita funding for another unit of measure (a given population group), the funding amount being used is divided by the specified population set.
Personal Consumption ExpendituresThe goods and services purchased by persons.
Placement TestA skills assessment offered to, or required of, newly enrolled students after they have arrived on campus. Institutions that use placement tests recognize that the academic preparation of students varies significantly based upon the rigor of their prior educational coursework. The results of the skills assessment are used to "place" or advise enrollment of students into courses appropriate to their level of readiness.
Portable FundingThis term refers to student financial aid awards that may be used at any college or university – regardless of whether or not the students remains at his or her original school or transfers to another one. The State of California's Cal Grant financial aid program is one example of portable student financial aid, however it is available only for qualified in-state institutions. Most federal student financial aid is portable among qualified instutions across the nation, assuming no changes in the student's eligibility status.
Post-BaccalaureateAt the California State University, refers to a student holds a baccalaureate or its equivalent and is not enrolled in a graduate degree program. A student pursuing a second baccalaureate is categorized as a postbaccalaureate student. At the University of California, it refers to student who holds a baccalaureate degree whose sole objective is a teacher education credential.
Post-Baccalaureate CertificateAn award that requires completion of an organized program of study requiring 18 credit hours beyond the bachelor's; designed for persons who have completed a baccalaureate degree, but do not meet the requirements of academic degrees carrying the title of master.
Postgraduate DegreeAn award conferred by a college, university, or other postsecondary education as official recognition for the successful completion of a program of studies past the baccalaureate level. These degrees include:
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
  • Post-Masters Certificate
  • Further Professional Certificate
  • Master's Degree
  • Doctoral Degree
  • Middle/Intermediate Degree
  • First-Professional Degree
  • Post-Masters CertificateAn award that requires completion of an organized program of study requiring 24 credit hours beyond the master's degree; designed for persons who have completed a master's degree, but do not meet the requirements of academic degrees at the doctor's level.
    Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - At least 1 but less than 2 YearsAn award that requires the completion of an organized program of study at the postsecondary level in at least 1 but less than 2 full-time equivalent academic years, or designed for completion in at least 30 but less than 60 credit hours, or in at least 900 but less than 1,800 contact hours.
    Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - At least 2 but less than 4 YearsAn award that requires the completion of an organized program of study at the postsecondary level in at least 2 but less than 4 full-time equivalent academic years, or designed for completion in at least 60 but less than 120 credit hours, or in at least 1,800 but less than 3,600 contact hours.
    Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - Less than 1 YearAn award that requires the completion of an organized program of study at the postsecondary level in less than 1 academic year (2 semesters or 3 quarters) or in less than 900 contact hours by a student enrolled full time.
    Precollegiate Academic Development (PAD) ProgramPrecollegiate Academic Development (PAD) Program is a unique program created by the California State University system to help middle and high school students to prepared for college level courses as well as provide information and skills to enhance the student's access to a higher education. Trained PAD tutors provide personalized academic enrichment in math, reading, and writing for students in the selected middle and high schools to assure their success in college level courses.
    Prepaid Tuition PlanPrepaid tuition plans are college savings plans that are guaranteed to increase in value at the same rate as college tuition at the participating institution. These college savings plans offer the same rate of increase on the savings as the increase in college costs, so that the participating student's tuition will be paid when he/she enters the postsecondary institution.

    These plans, along with other college savings plans, are Qualified Tuition Programs (QTP) and are also known as "Section 529 Plans." These are named after section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, which specifies the requirements for the plans to be free from federal income taxes. Prepaid tuition plans allow the user to lock in future tuition rates at participating in-state colleges at current prices and are usually guaranteed by that state.

    Various schools and states offer these types of programs, though in recent years more states have moved towards the more traditional college savings plans allowed under section 529. These plans are more flexible savings vehicle, but do not offer a tuition guarantee.

    Professional JudgmentIn the area of student financial aid, professional judgment is the discretion an institution's financial aid administrator has to adjust, with proper documentation, the expected family contribution (EFC), the cost of attendance (COA), or dependency status of a student. Such discretion can be used when major changes occur in the student or family situation. Examples of such changes may include death, divorce, unemployment, disability, etc.
    Proposition 98On November 8, 1988, voters of the State approved Proposition 98, the "Classroom Instructional Improvement and Accountability Act," a combined initiative constitutional amendment and statute designed to guarantee public primary, elementary, secondary and community college education (referred to as K-14) a minimum share of the State's General Fund revenues each year. Other State agencies (the departments of Developmental Service and Mental Health, the State Special Schools, and the California Youth Authority) also receive funding under Proposition 98; however, their combined share averages less than one-third of 1 percent of annual Proposition 98 funding. The initiative was later modified by provisions contained in Proposition 111, approved by the voters in June of 1990.

    Under Proposition 98 C as modified by Proposition 111 C public schools and community colleges are to get the greater of: {a} in general, a set percentage of General Fund revenues (commonly referred to as "Test 1"); {b} the amount of General Funds appropriated to K-14 in the prior fiscal year, adjusted for changes in the cost-of-living (as measured by changes in State per-capita personal income) and enrollment ("Test 2"); or, {c} a third test that replaces "Test 2" in any year in which the percentage growth in per-capita General Fund revenues from the prior year plus 0.50 percent is less than the percentage growth in State per-capita personal income ("Test 3"). Under "Test 3", K-14 receives the same amount appropriated to it in the prior year, adjusted for changes in enrollment and per-capita General Fund revenues plus another small adjustment factor. In any year that "Test 3" is used, K-14 receives a "credit" for future revenue years in which the General Fund is larger than the difference between the "Test 3" amount and the amount that would have been appropriated under "Text 2."

    Proposition 98 School FundingOn November 8, 1988, voters of the State approved Proposition 98, the "Classroom Instructional Improvement and Accountability Act," a combined initiative constitutional amendment and statute designed to guarantee public primary, elementary, secondary (K-12) and community college education (referred to as K-14) a minimum share of the State’s General Fund revenues each year. Other State agencies (the departments of Developmental Service and Mental Health, the State Special Schools, and the California Youth Authority) also receive funding under Proposition 98; however, their combined share averages less than one-third of 1 percent of annual Proposition 98 funding. The initiative was later modified by provisions contained in Proposition 111, approved by the voters in June of 1990. Under Proposition 98 C as modified by Proposition 111 C public schools and community colleges are to get the greater of: {a} in general, a set percentage of General Fund revenues (commonly referred to as "Test 1"); {b} the amount of General Funds appropriated to K-14 in the prior fiscal year, adjusted for changes in the cost-of-living (as measured by changes in State per-capita personal income) and enrollment ("Test 2"); or, {c} a third test that replaces "Test 2" in any year in which the percentage growth in per-capita General Fund revenues from the prior year plus 0.50 percent is less than the percentage growth in State per-capita personal income ("Test 3"). Under "Test 3", K-14 receives the same amount appropriated to it in the prior year, adjusted for changes in enrollment and per-capita General Fund revenues plus another small adjustment factor. In any year that "Test 3" is used, K-14 receives a "credit" for future revenue years in which the General Fund is larger than the difference between the "Test 3" amount and the amount that would have been appropriated under "Text 2."
    Public ServiceFor the University of California, activities funded within this category include campus public service, cooperative extension, and the contract with the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. A major component of public service is the University's intersegmental outreach and K-14 improvement programs designed to provide assistance to K-14 students and schools to encourage more students to become qualified for higher education. Outreach includes such programs as MESA, Puente, Early Academic Outreach Programs, Community College Transfer Centers and the California Subject Matter Projects. Campus public service includes such programs as EQUALS, Lawrence Hall of Science, the California Articulation Number, Scripps Aquarium-Museum, the California State Summer School for Math and Science (a program for gifted K-12 students), and the Teratogen Registry.
    Puente ProjectPuente's mission is to help educationally underserved students in California succeed academically, enroll in college and return to the community as mentors and leaders. The Puente Project provides three areas of service to students: teaching, counseling, and mentoring. Puente trains school and college staff members to conduct this program at their sites.
    QuarterRefers to three 12-week sessions that comprise the academic year. The range may be from 10 to 15 weeks. There may be an additional quarter in the summer. (Data Element Dictionary)
    Record IDA unique identifier of a school/institution in the Crosswalk table.
    Record IDA unique identifier of a school/institution in the Crosswalk table.
    RegionA geographic subdivision of the state for use in statewide planning and statistical analysis. Starting in 2003, the Commission uses the following fourteen regions (View a map): A cross-walk between these regions, the Commission's historic regions, and regions used by other agencies can be found in the Data Element Cross-Walk System. (Data Element Dictionary)
    Region (Historic)A geographic subdivision of the state for use in statewide planning and statistical analysis. The Commission used the following eleven regions prior to 2003 (View a map): A cross-walk between these regions, the Commission's current regions, and regions used by other agencies can be found in the Data Element Cross-Walk System.
    Regional Occupational Centers/Programs (ROCPs)These centers/programs provide vocational training and academic education to high school pupils and adults. Courses offered by ROCPs cover a wide range of job-related training, which is conducted in facilities on high school sites, centers, or business sites.
    Research and Development Price Index (R&DI)The R&DI measures changes in the price of goods and services bought by colleges and universities through current direct expenditures for sponsored research, excluding indirect (overhead) research costs charged to other departments. The direct expenditures for sponsored research priced by the R&DI consists of salaries and wages for professional and non­professional personnel, fringe benefits, contracted services, supplies and materials, and equipment.
    ResidentA person who resides in the state in which a college is located. Such persons are eligible for in-state or resident charges at publicly supported colleges and universities in that state. In California, each of the public postsecondary education systems have their own residency requirements for admission.
    Restricted FundsBudgeted funds within the University of California that are not identified by a 199XX fund number and that are earmarked for specific purposes, such as hospital income for teaching hospitals, fees for University Extension courses, and room and board charges for dormitory operations are restricted funds.
    RWPEDAThe Regional Workforce Preparation and Economic Development Act (RWPEDA) was adopted by the California Legislature in 1996 as part of the Welfare-to-Work Act. Senate Bill 1744 reauthorized the Act in 1998. This Act is an extremely important piece of legislation that reaches out to all citizens of California. Its overarching vision is to unite economic development with education and workforce preparation (job training and employment programs) to assure that California has a world-class competitive workforce.

    The Act was written in recognition of research showing that the State did not have one economy, but rather many regional economies. The vision of the Act is to be achieved by the “…integration of existing local and regional partnerships that support initiatives in education, workforce preparation and economic development” that will “demonstrate how, through the collaboration of state and local resources, education, workforce preparation and economic development services can be delivered to clients in a more responsive, integrated and effective manner.”

    RWPEDAThe Regional Workforce Preparation and Economic Development Act (RWPEDA) was adopted by the California Legislature in 1996 as part of the Welfare-to-Work Act. Senate Bill 1744 reauthorized the Act in 1998. This Act is an extremely important piece of legislation that reaches out to all citizens of California. Its overarching vision is to unite economic development with education and workforce preparation (job training and employment programs) to assure that California has a world-class competitive workforce.

    The Act was written in recognition of research showing that the State did not have one economy, but rather many regional economies. The vision of the Act is to be achieved by the “…integration of existing local and regional partnerships that support initiatives in education, workforce preparation and economic development” that will “demonstrate how, through the collaboration of state and local resources, education, workforce preparation and economic development services can be delivered to clients in a more responsive, integrated and effective manner.”

    Sacramento Area Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. The Sacramento Area is the northern-most portion of California’s central valley and consists of four counties (View a map):
    • El Dorado
    • Placer
    • Sacramento
    • Yolo
    Sacramento-Tahoe RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
    San Bernardino/Riverside Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region, consisting of two counties, is projected to experience the largest population growth over the next ten years (View a map):
    • Riverside
    • San Bernardino
    San Diego/Imperial Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. The two counties that comprise this region border Mexico (View a map):
    • Imperial
    • San Diego
    San Diego-Imperial RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
    San Francisco Bay Area Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region consists of the traditional nine Bay Area counties that are often treated as a unified region by various planning agencies (View a map):
    • Alameda
    • Contra Costa
    • Marin
    • Napa
    • San Francisco
    • San Mateo
    • Santa Clara
    • Solano
    • Sonoma
    San Francisco Bay Area RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
    SATA standardized admissions examination (formerly known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the Scholastic Achievement Test) of mathematical and language arts skills. The test is taken by high school students to demonstrate their knowledge and potential for success in university level study. The test is usually required for admission to public university undergraduate programs.
    SATA standardized admissions examination (formerly known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the Scholastic Achievement Test) of mathematical and language arts skills. The test is taken by high school students to demonstrate their knowledge and potential for success in university level study. The test is usually required for admission to public university undergraduate programs.
    SCANSThe Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCAN) was convened in February 1990 to examine the demands of the workplace and to determine whether the current and future workforce is capable of meeting those demands. The Commission identified five competencies (i.e., skills necessary for workplace success) and three foundations (i.e., skills and qualities that underlie competencies). The competencies include resources, interpersonal skills, information, systems, and technology. The underlying foundations are: basic skills-reading, writing, arithmetic and mathematics, speaking, and listening; thinking skills-thinking creatively, making decisions, solving problems, knowing how to learn, reasoning; and personal qualities-individual responsibility, self-esteem, sociability, and integrity.
    SCANSThe Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCAN) was convened in February 1990 to examine the demands of the workplace and to determine whether the current and future workforce is capable of meeting those demands. The Commission identified five competencies (i.e., skills necessary for workplace success) and three foundations (i.e., skills and qualities that underlie competencies). The competencies include resources, interpersonal skills, information, systems, and technology. The underlying foundations are: basic skills-reading, writing, arithmetic and mathematics, speaking, and listening; thinking skills-thinking creatively, making decisions, solving problems, knowing how to learn, reasoning; and personal qualities-individual responsibility, self-esteem, sociability, and integrity.
    ScholarshipA scholarship is an award of financial aid for college attendance that usually is given for academic merit or achievement or for a special talent a student posesses in an extra-curricular activity. A scholarship is considered gift aid and does not have to be paid back.
    Scholarship LoanA scholarship loan is money which generally is given for academic merit or achievement or for a special talent a student posesses in an extra-curricular activity. As a loan, these awards must be repaid in cash or by some type of service after graduation. Repayment provisions vary by program.
    School CodeRefers to the 7-digit school code portion of the 14-digit County-District-School (CDS) Code.
    Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) DisciplinesAny discipline (program) related to Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics. These programs lead to careers that are considered important by many scholars to the foundation of an advanced society.

    Acronym: STEM

    See the related links below for a list of CIP codes related to STEM disciplines.

    SegmentOne of the systems of higher education in California. (Data Element Dictionary)
    Segment CodeThe Segment Code is a part of the 6-digit CPEC Code. The first letter of the CPEC Code denotes the Segment. The University of California campuses start with "A", the California State University campuses start with "B", the California Community Colleges start with "C", other public institutions start with "D", the Independent colleges and universities start with "E", and outside institutions start with "G". (Data Element Dictionary)
    Self-HelpIn student financial aid, self-help is that portion of the total college budget a student is responsible for. The studnet is expected to produce sufficient earnings to meet this expectation through summer and part-time jobs, student savings, and other student or family assets.
    SemesterRefers to two 15-week sessions that make up the academic year.
    SeniorRefers to students who have completed 90 or more semester or 135 or more quarter credit hours.
    SOC CodeStandard Occupational Classification (SOC) Code is a Code designed to classify and identify all occupations in which work is performed for pay or profit, reflecting the current occupational structure in the United States.
    SOC CodeStandard Occupational Classification (SOC) Code is a Code designed to classify and identify all occupations in which work is performed for pay or profit, reflecting the current occupational structure in the United States.
    SophomoreAt the California State University, student level sophomore refers to students who have completed 30 to fewer than 60 semester or 45 to fewer than 90 quarter credit hours. At the University of California, sophomore refers to students who have completed at least 45 but not more than 89.9 quarter units (30-59.9 semester units).
    South Coast Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region consists of the three counties just south of the Central Coast region (View a map):
    • San Luis Obispo
    • Santa Barbara
    • Ventura
    South San Joaquin Valley RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical starting in 2003. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
    Southern Central Valley Historic RegionOne of eleven regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis prior to 2003. This region is the southern-most portion of California’s central valley and consists of five counties (View a map):
    • Fresno
    • Inyo
    • Kern
    • Kings
    • Tulare
    Special Account For Capital Outlay (SAFCO)This fund is supplied with tidelands oil revenues.
    Special StudentAt the University of California, special student refers to lower division students of mature years who have not had the opportunity to complete a satisfactory high school program, who have not completed a substantial amount of college work, and who, by reason of special attainments, may be prepared to undertake courses in the university toward a definite and limited objective.
    Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) SystemStandard Occupational Classification (SOC) Code is a Code designed to classify and identify all occupations in which work is performed for pay or profit, reflecting the current occupational structure in the United States.
    State Appropriations LimitAs described by the materials from the State Treasurer, the State of California is subject to an annual limit on its appropriations imposed by Article XIII B of the State Constitution, which was adopted by the State's voters as Proposition 4 in 1979. This "State Appropriations Limit" (SAL) was significantly modified by the voters in Proposition 98 and Proposition 111 (discussed above). Nearly all-state authorizations to spend proceeds of taxes are subject to the SAL. Essentially, this phrase refers to tax revenues, some regulatory license fees, and "excess" user fees (fees collected above levels needed to provide the service for which they are being collected). "Proceeds of taxes" excludes most State subventions to local governments, tax refunds and some benefit payments, such as unemployment insurance.

    Specifically excluded from the SAL are appropriations for: (1) debt service on bonds in existence prior to January 1, 1979 and those bonds approved by the voters subsequently; (2) appropriations required to comply with mandates of courts or the federal government; and (3) appropriations for "qualified" capital outlay projects and appropriations derived from State gasoline tax increases and motor vehicle weight fee increases, per Prop 111 (explained below). Several initiatives approved in recent years were specifically written to be exempt from the Article XIII limits and were structured to create new revenue sources dedicated to specific uses, such as the tobacco tax increase in Proposition 99 in 1988. The SAL may also be suspended in cases of emergency as declared by the Governor (natural disasters and civil disturbances). If the SAL is otherwise exceeded (i.e., appropriations are made over the limit on approval by a two-thirds vote of the Legislature and the Governor), the entire excess must be recaptured over the next three fiscal years by lowering State appropriations.

    Originally, the SAL was based on actual fiscal year 1978-79 authorizations; however, this method changed starting in fiscal year 1991-92, because of provisions in Proposition 111. The 1991-92 SAL was recalculated based upon the 1986-87 SAL and implementing the annual adjustment procedures spelled out in Prop 111. These provisions require that the SAL in each year be based on the State limit for the prior year, adjusted annually for changes in State per-capita personal income and changes in population. When applicable, this adjustment would also account for transfers of the financial responsibility for providing public services among units of government. As amended by Prop 111, the SAL is tested (calculated) over consecutive two-year periods, with any excess "proceeds of taxes" collected over that time that fall above the combined SALs for those two years split equally between K-14 education and refunds to taxpayers.

    State Determined FundsThe term "State-determined funds," as defined here, includes only those fund sources used for operating expenses for the general, non-restricted educational missions of the three public higher education systems over which they and/or the State (through the Legislature and Governor) have policy and allocation authority.
    State General FundThe State General Fund is the main account for State revenues from which appropriations for most State programs emanate. It is used to account for all revenues and activities financed by the State that are not required by law to be accounted for by any other fund. Most State expenditures are financed from the General Fund. Normally, the only difference between the General Fund and the other governmental cost funds are constitutional or statutory restrictions placed on the use of the other governmental cost funds.
    State-Approved InstitutionsA college or university approved to operate in the State of California by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE).
    STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics) DisciplinesAny discipline (program) related to Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics.

    SEE: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics for additional information.

    STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics) DisciplinesAny discipline (program) related to Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics.

    SEE: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics for additional information.

    STRF (Student Tuition Recovery Fund)The name of the fund mandated by law for the purpose of providing relief or mitigating pecuniary losses by any California resident who is enrolled at an approved private postsecondary school and meets all conditions specified in law.
    Student FeesFees paid by college students ordinarily cover indirect instructional costs, such as student support services, extramural activities, student events, and charges for specific courses (technology fees). Fees are also charged to students for related services including health insurance, parking and housing (dormitory fees). In California public colleges and universities, revenues generated by student fees are used for both direct and indirect educational operations much like student tuition funds are used in other states. (see Student Tuition)
    Student LevelAn indication of a student's level of progress toward a degree, diploma, or certificate, as defined by the institution. (Data Element Dictionary) Student levels that appear in the Commission's data include:
    • Concurrent High School
    • Lower Division
    • Freshman
    • Sophomore
    • Special Student
    • Upper Division
    • Junior
    • Senior
    • Limited Student
    • Degree-Seeking Undergraduate
    • Unclassified Undergraduate
    • Undergraduate
    • Post-Baccalaureate
    • Teaching Credential Student
    • Masters
    • Graduate I
    • Graduate II
    • Graduate Ia (Degree-Seeking)
    • Graduate
    • First Professional
    • Further Professional
    • Intern
    • Resident
    • Unknown Student Level
    • AA/AS Recipient Returning to College
    • BA/BS Recipient Returning to College
    Student TuitionTuition in higher education generally refers to charges for educational instruction paid by students attending postsecondary institutions. These costs include both direct instruction (employee salaries, campus operating expenses and capital and administrative costs, etc.) and related services provided by the college or university. Revenues generated from student fee charges in California’s public higher education systems are generally used to fund educational operations in the same manner tuition revenues are used in other states. (see Student Fees)
    Superior California RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning and statistical analysis. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
    System CodeThe System code is an elaboration of the Segment code. (Data Element Dictionary)

    • A: University of California
    • AS: UC systemwide office
    • B: California State University
    • BS: CSU systemwide office
    • C: Community Colleges
    • CD: Community Colleges District Office
    • CS: Community Colleges Chancellor's Office
    • D: Other Public Colleges and Universities
    • P: State-approved institutions
    • W: WASC-Accredited Non-Public institutions
    Talent Search ProgramThe Talent Search Program identifies and assists individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who have the potential to succeed in higher education. The program provides academic, career, and financial counseling to its participants and encourages them to graduate from high school and continue on to the postsecondary school of their choice. Talent Search also serves high school dropouts by encouraging them to reenter the educational system and complete their education. The goal of Talent Search is to increase the number of youth from disadvantaged backgrounds who complete high school and enroll in the postsecondary education institution of their choice.
    Teaching Credential StudentRefers to students who are currently enrolled in the Teacher Credential program, planning to receive a single or multiple teaching credential at the end of the program.
    Title IV ProgramsThis term refers to all programs created by Title IV of the federal Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, and generally refers to student financial aid programs. These programs include: includes the following programs: Unsubsidized FFEL loans, Subsidized FFEL loans, Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Subsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Federal Perkins Loans, FFEL PLUS Loans, Federal Direct PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grants, Federal SEOG.
    TOEFL (Test of English as Foreign Language)A standardized test administered world-wide to determine proficiency in English and required by most US institutions of all foreign applicants whose first language is other than English.
    TransferThe process of continuing enrollment at a college or university other than the one in which a student is currently enrolled. Generally the term "transfer" student refers to a student who has completed two years of full-time lower division college coursework, either in general education or a "major preparation" coursework for a selected degree program.
    Transfer Admission Guarantee (TAG)This University of California program (most predominantly at UC Riverside and UC San Diego) encourages students to begin their college career at a California community college and then transfer to the UC to complete the bachelor's degree. TAG participants enter into a contract with the receiving UC campus that specifies the requirements that these students must satisfy for admission while at the community college. The program provides students guaranteed admission to the UC campus’ college and academic term of choice, but does not necessarily for impacted majors. Each participating UC campus develops its own TAG with area community colleges and these agreements vary by campus.
    Transfer AdmitsA count of the actual number of transfer-eligible community college students who apply for and are accepted for enrollment in a baccalaureate institution in a given year. This term is the second in the transfer sequence of "Applicant" "Admits" and "Enrolleds." Transfer admissibility is one measure of how effective community colleges are in helping students achieve transfer eligibility. It also is one gauge of the utility of baccalaureate institution outreach efforts to potential transfer students and of the effectiveness of faculty articulation efforts and other transfer processes.
    Transfer AgreementThese are specific agreements that a community college student enters into with a CSU or UC campus, stipulating that admission as an upper division student is assured providing the student satisfies the specific requirements delineated in the agreement. These agreements typically lists the courses the student will complete at community college, with emphasis on courses required for admission, major prerequisites, and breadth requirements. Students who comply with the agreement and apply for admission on time during the appropriate filing period are guaranteed admission to a specific academic term in advance. In many cases, these agreements do not guarantee transfer into the department or major of first choice, however students with these agreements generally stand a better chance of gaining such enrollment.
    Transfer Agreement ProgramThis term refers to the combination of programs, policies and practices that CSU and UC campuses use to facilitate the transfer of community college student. These TAPs are usually established between CSU/UC campuses and local area community colleges. The transfer agreement program incorporates enrollment planning and management to assure that adequate spaces exist for students who have prepared themselves for transfer. It also includes the procedures by which a community college makes students aware of the requirements that must be met to successfully transfer to one of the State's public universities.
    Transfer Alliance Program (TAP)This University of California program (initiated at UCLA) gives students at participating community colleges an opportunity to transfer to participating UC campuses as juniors. Students in this program complete an honors/scholars program at the community college. Faculty and counselors at the community colleges help students plan academic programs that meet major and general education requirements and honors/scholars certification. Students who complete the program are given priority consideration for admission to the College of Letters and Science at the UC campus. Students participating in TAP learn more about the UC through meetings with counselors, faculty, and students, including students who have transferred to the UC from the same community college. TAP students may use the UC library and participate in cultural and sports events on campus.
    Transfer ApplicantsA count of the number of community college students who apply for transfer to a baccalaureate institution in a given year. This term is the first in the transfer sequence of "Applicant" "Admits" and "Enrolleds." The numbers of students applying for transfer serves as one measure of the effectiveness of the many community college and intersegmental initiatives designed to help community colleges students achieve transfer eligibility and pursue a baccalaureate education.
    Transfer EligibleAn estimate, or actual count, of the numbers of community college students who have met or exceeded transfer requirements published by the California State University, the University of California, and independent institutions. Transfer eligibility is essentially determined by requirements established by the "receiving" (baccalaureate) institutions. As such, it is driven by the efficiency of these requirements and by how effective community colleges are at preparing students to meet them. Changes in transfer eligibility also help measure the effectiveness of intersegmental transfer efforts, such as CAN and IGETC, and the utilization of ASSIST.
    Transfer EnrolledA count of the actual number of community college students who enroll in a baccalaureate institution as transfer students . This term is the third in the transfer sequence of "Applicant" "Admits" and "Enrolleds." This term also defines the numbers reported annually by the Commission as actual transfer students. Improvement in the number of transfer enrolled community college students is the State's highest policy goal in the area of transfer. As such, assessing changes in transfer "Enrolleds" is the most effective measure of the interrelation and effectiveness of all the State's transfer services, programs and processes.
    Transfer Opportunity Program (TOP)These programs operated by some University of California campuses, encourage community college students to transfer to a UC by providing support services to ease their transition. The program provides a transfer advisor who regularly visits each participating community college to work with counselors and students. The TOP advisor provides information about admission and transfer requirements, academic programs, financial aid, housing, tutoring, campus life, and other services and programs. The advisor evaluates student transcripts to assure that admission requirements are met and that community college courses taken are transferable to the University. The TOP advisor also works with counselors and students to develop individual transfer admission agreements.
    Transfer UnitsCredit earned in courses that are transferable to the CSU, UC, independent institution, or other college or university that a student plans to attend. All community colleges have a course numbering system for identifying transferable courses. This information is included in the community college's catalog. Credit is given to the community college that has the most transferable units.
    TrimesterAn academic year consisting of three terms of about 15 weeks each. (Data Element Dictionary)
    TSE (Test of Spoken English)A test designed to assess the spoken English proficiency of people whose native language is not English. The TSE is often required of graduate students seeking assistantships.
    U.S. Consumer Price Index (CPI)The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics "Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers," or U.S. CPI, is a measure of the average change in prices over time in a fixed market basket of goods and services purchased by U.S. residents. According to the Bureau, the items included in the pricing survey are: food, clothing, shelter, transportation costs, medical and dental care charges, and other goods that people buy for day-to-day living. All of the taxes directly associated with the purchase and use of items are included in the index. Items in this market basket are weighted for importance in the base year, as determined by a survey of consumer expenditures; relative weights change over time as the price of items rises more or less rapidly than the overall index. Prices are collected in 85 geographic areas around the country, utilizing more than 57,000 housing units and 19,000 retail businesses. The U.S. CPI is based on monthly pricing of the market basket and this pricing occurs throughout the entire month.
    UCAcronym for the University of California, which is administered by the University of California Office of the President (UCOP).
    UCAcronym for the University of California, which is administered by the University of California Office of the President (UCOP).
    UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP)UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) provides online Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, textbooks, tutoring, and AP test preparation at no cost to eligible high school students who otherwise would not have the opportunity to achieve eligibility or competitive eligibility for admission to the University of California and other top universities.
    UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP)UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) provides online Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, textbooks, tutoring, and AP test preparation at no cost to eligible high school students who otherwise would not have the opportunity to achieve eligibility or competitive eligibility for admission to the University of California and other top universities.
    UC Public Service ProgramsFor the University of California, public service activities include campus public service, cooperative extension, and the contract with the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. A major component of public service is the University’s intersegmental outreach and K-14 improvement programs designed to provide assistance to K-14 students and schools to encourage more students to become qualified for higher education. Outreach includes such programs as MESA, Puente, Early Academic Outreach Programs, Community College Transfer Centers and the California Subject Matter Projects. Campus public service includes such programs as EQUALS, Lawrence Hall of Science, the California Articulation Number, Scripps Aquarium-Museum, the California State Summer School for Math and Science (a program for gifted K-12 students), and the Teratogen Registry.
    UCCP (UC College Prep Initiative)UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) provides online Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, textbooks, tutoring, and AP test preparation at no cost to eligible high school students who otherwise would not have the opportunity to achieve eligibility or competitive eligibility for admission to the University of California and other top universities.
    UCCP (UC College Prep Initiative)UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) provides online Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, textbooks, tutoring, and AP test preparation at no cost to eligible high school students who otherwise would not have the opportunity to achieve eligibility or competitive eligibility for admission to the University of California and other top universities.
    UCCP (UC College Prep Initiative)UC College Prep Initiative (UCCP) provides online Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors courses, textbooks, tutoring, and AP test preparation at no cost to eligible high school students who otherwise would not have the opportunity to achieve eligibility or competitive eligibility for admission to the University of California and other top universities.
    UCRP -- University of California Retirement ProgramUCRP is the acronym for the University of California Retirement Program (also referred to as UCRS University of California Retirement System). This is a retirement system set up for University of California employees.
    UCRP -- University of California Retirement ProgramUCRP is the acronym for the University of California Retirement Program (also referred to as UCRS University of California Retirement System). This is a retirement system set up for University of California employees.
    Unclassified UndergraduatesRefers to students who are currently enrolled at California Community Colleges and the student academic level is unclassified.
    UndergraduateA student enrolled in the first two years of a 4 or 5 year baccalaureate degree program, in an associate's degree program, or a vocational or technical program below the baccalaureate who is a degree-seeking student and has not earned a first bachelor’s degree at a college or university.
    UndergraduateA student enrolled in the first two years of a 4 or 5 year baccalaureate degree program, in an associate's degree program, or a vocational or technical program below the baccalaureate who is a degree-seeking student and has not earned a first bachelor’s degree at a college or university.
    Undergraduate DegreeAn award conferred by a college, university, or other postsecondary education as official recognition for the successful completion of a program of studies prior to the baccalaureate level. These degrees include:
    • Certificate
    • Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - Less than 1 Year
    • Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - At least 1 but less than 2 Years
    • Pre-Baccalaureate Certificate - At least 2 but less than 4 Years
    • Associate Degree
    • Bachelor's Degree
    University FundsAll University of California-generated income that is classified as General Purpose Resources (budgeted under a 199XX fund number) and that includes nonresident tuition; the State's share of overhead receipts from federal contracts and grants and the Department of Energy Laboratories management fee; interest earned on General Purpose Resource Fund balances; application fee income and income from certain other student fees and charges; and miscellaneous sources such as farm income, and sales and service income.
    University GoingEnrolling at four-year colleges, universities, and other institutions granting a bachelor's degree.
    University of CaliforniaOne of the three public segments of higher education. The University of California (UC) serves about 189,000 students annually.
    University of CaliforniaOne of the three public segments of higher education. The University of California (UC) serves about 189,000 students annually.
    University of California Retirement Program (UCRP)University of California Retirement Program (also referred to as UCRS University of California Retirement System): A retirement system set up for University of California employees.
    Upper DivisionCourses designed for the third and fourth (junior and senior) years of study toward a bachelor's degree. These courses are not offered by community colleges, and they often require completion of pre-requisite courses ("major preparation" courses). This term also refers to junior and senior students in baccalaureate degree granting institutions.
    Upper DivisionCourses designed for the third and fourth (junior and senior) years of study toward a bachelor's degree. These courses are not offered by community colleges, and they often require completion of pre-requisite courses ("major preparation" courses). This term also refers to junior and senior students in baccalaureate degree granting institutions.
    Upper Sacramento Valley RegionOne of fourteen regions used by the Commission for planning purposes. This region consists of the following counties (View a map):
    Upward Bound ProgramThe Upward Bound Program provides fundamental support to participants in their preparation for college entrance. The program provides opportunities for participants to succeed in pre-college performance and ultimately in higher education pursuits. Upward Bound serves high school students from low-income families, high school students from families in which neither parent holds a bachelors degree, and low-income, first-generation military veterans who are preparing to enter postsecondary education. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rates at which participants enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education.
    WASCAcronym for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is one of six regional associations that accredit public and private schools, colleges, and universities in the United States. The Western region covers institutions in California and Hawaii, the territories of Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Palau, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, the Pacific Basin, and East Asia, and areas of the Pacific and East Asia where American/International schools or colleges may apply to it for service. The accrediting activities of WASC are conducted by the three Commissions. Each Commission works with a different segment of education
    WASCAcronym for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is one of six regional associations that accredit public and private schools, colleges, and universities in the United States. The Western region covers institutions in California and Hawaii, the territories of Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Palau, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, the Pacific Basin, and East Asia, and areas of the Pacific and East Asia where American/International schools or colleges may apply to it for service. The accrediting activities of WASC are conducted by the three Commissions. Each Commission works with a different segment of education
    WASC-Accredited Non-public 2-Year InstitutionsPrivate postsecondary institutions that offer two-year education programs accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). In California, non-public WASC-accredited institutions generally belong to the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities -- the AICCU. WASC accredits private (independent) schools throughout the region. WASC also works collaboratively with a variety of private school associations. Separate agreements exist with respect to the use of protocols and the procedures. The schools utilize the WASC Focus on Learning protocol a jointly developed modification of the WASC Focus on Learning document or a nationally or locally developed protocol that has been approved by the WASC Commission. However, all jointly accredited schools follow the same overall processes with respect to the following: initial visits, full action-up and action plan, reviews, mid-term reviews, written progress reports, special visits, and substantive change visits.
    WASCSRAcronym for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, accrediting commission for Senior Colleges and Universities. The Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities is one of three accrediting commissions for different educational levels that comprise WASC. The agency is recognized as the regional accrediting body for the accreditation and preaccreditation ("Candidate for Accreditation") of senior colleges and universities in California, Hawaii, the United States territories of Guam and American Samoa, the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The Commission currently accredits 149 institutions and preaccredits four institutions located throughout its region. Accreditation by the Commission enables those institutions to establish eligibility to participate in the Higher Education Act and other Federal programs. Therefore, the Commission must meet the separate and independent requirements.
    Workforce DevelopmentWorkforce Development refers to the entirety of the systems by which people are educated, trained, upgraded and retrained for employment and participation in the workforce. Included in the process are all segments of the system-from K-12 education and postsecondary institutions to public and private training programs to economic development and employment expansion programs.
    Work-Study ProgramAlso known as "College Work-Study," these state and federal programs provides students with part-time employment to help them finance the costs of postsecondary education.